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Oct
10
asked How to check why a python module is being imported?
Oct
7
awarded  Good Question
Sep
21
awarded  Custodian
Sep
21
accepted How do you implement “#ifdef” in python?
Sep
21
comment HTML: Changing default cursor does not work until pointer is moved
How will cursor:auto; will solve my problems? How does auto know what kind of cursor I want? Where should I put it, in the CSS, in the html, ...?
Sep
21
comment How do you implement “#ifdef” in python?
Sure, I have already considered that. That is what I really need to do, but I am not sure I can automatically edit all instances (I have over 30000 lines of code). And I am specially worried that I will edit the wrong instances. So I need to do this with care. I was now looking for a simple solution to my problem. Maybe __debug__ is the easiest thing to implement.
Sep
21
comment HTML: Changing default cursor does not work until pointer is moved
Thanks @msksiva, but that is difficult for me to do.
Sep
21
comment How do you implement “#ifdef” in python?
Thanks for the general explanation. So what you are suggesting is to replace my loggers with a simple function for production, which throws away the messages? Interesting approach, but it seems a bit convoluted, and I do not see any advantage to using the logging module, which is basically doing the same: throwing away the messages if the level is not allowed.
Sep
21
comment How do you implement “#ifdef” in python?
ok, I think I can probably live with that. I assume the overhead of passing N references is really minimal. Except that I have been so stupid to do log.debug('%s' % (big_object)) in lots of places, and changing that will not be easy. And last question: in case I decide to use __debug__, I guess I should precede my logging statements with if __debug__: and run with python -O? I have a problem here: my python scripts are "crunchbanged" (#!/usr/bin/env python), and I call them by name. How would I pass the -O flag here?
Sep
21
comment How do you implement “#ifdef” in python?
Thanks, very helpful description of __debug__. You say logging.debug would be very close to a no-op. What about logging commands which have big dictionaries / objects? Would that not require certain processing (stack management?) during parameter passing, even if the logging module decides to discard the message and return immediately?
Sep
21
comment How do you implement “#ifdef” in python?
This looks like an interesting approach. So I should precede my logging statements with if __debug__: and run with python -O? I have a problem here: my python scripts are "crunchbanged" (#!/usr/bin/env python). How would I pass the -O flag here? And another question: would __debug__ completely avoid processing the related statements, even in the syntax parsing phase?
Sep
21
comment How do you implement “#ifdef” in python?
Mostly for logging, and I am using the logging module for that. The problem is that my log statements are sometimes very heavy, including passing of big objects. I want to completely remove all parsing of those log statements for production. I do not know that I can do that with the logging module, since even if the logging level is decreased, the logging module still will be called in order to decide whether or not to show the logging messages.
Sep
21
comment HTML: Changing default cursor does not work until pointer is moved
@venkateshwar: I do not see why that would help: I have already defined the cursor style in the CSS, together with the rest of the styles needed for the overlay to do its work. Anyway, it is not easy for me to modify directly the style (I am editing the html with a framework, and I am not sure how to do certain things).
Sep
21
asked How do you implement “#ifdef” in python?
Sep
21
asked HTML: Changing default cursor does not work until pointer is moved
Sep
13
accepted Import a package defined by a variable
Sep
13
asked Import a package defined by a variable
Sep
9
accepted jQuery: react to form auto-filling by browser
Sep
9
comment jQuery: react to form auto-filling by browser
Yes, that is what I did too, and it worked (200ms), but of course makes the result dependent on how fast the browser performs form autocompletion. Anyway, I will accept this hackish option. :)
Sep
9
comment jQuery: react to form auto-filling by browser
Thanks, this is what I have implemented: <script> $(document).ready(function () { $("#email").trigger('change'); }); </script>. It triggers the change event, but I would say it is too early, since the form is already not filled in, and nothing happens.