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Nov
22
revised Does idiomatic Haskell try to eliminate pair operations fst and snd, as it does head,init,tail etc?
Original answer was wrong.
Nov
22
comment How to [temporarily] suppress “defined but not used” warnings?
Yes, but when I temporarily remove warnings it's temporary, so I'll get to see those warnings soon enough.
Nov
22
answered How to [temporarily] suppress “defined but not used” warnings?
Nov
22
revised Does idiomatic Haskell try to eliminate pair operations fst and snd, as it does head,init,tail etc?
added 97 characters in body
Nov
22
answered Does idiomatic Haskell try to eliminate pair operations fst and snd, as it does head,init,tail etc?
Nov
20
comment Deciphering addC Code and carry
Oh, and the code is wrong. One of the the left in the case statement should be carry. Doesn't matter which one.
Nov
20
comment Deciphering addC Code and carry
The addC function implements a ripple carry adder and the case statement is simply a full adder. You need to learn about binary arithmetic to understand the code, once you do it's almost trivial.
Nov
19
answered Haskell arrays vs lists
Nov
18
comment Resources for learning idiomatic Haskell (eta reduction, symbolic infix operators, libraries etc.)
+1 for HLint, it's a great tool.
Nov
18
comment How does Haskell actually define the + function?
The whole point of having infinite lists of digits is to have stream algorithms on the, i.e., something that can take two streams and incrementally add them. And the more digits you ask for the more you get. You representation doesn't work for that. If instead you want to work with better and better finite approximations (i.e. Cauchy sequences) there is no point in having a stream of digits. Use a stream of rationals instead.
Nov
18
comment How does Haskell actually define the + function?
You should look into the field of exact real arithmetic. It's pretty well studied.
Nov
18
comment How does Haskell actually define the + function?
You need more redundancy to make this work. E.g., data Bit = MinusOne | Zero | One; data RealReal = RealReal Bit RealReal.
Nov
18
comment How does Haskell actually define the + function?
Assuming you are going to look at some initial segment of the bits then you run into trouble definition addition, because you cannot bound the lookahead to determine the carry. E.g., 0.010101... + 0.0010101... What's the first after the .? You would have to look infinitely far to determine it. Which means addition cannot produce even a single bit of the result.
Nov
18
comment How does Haskell actually define the + function?
If you never plan to use any of the bits then you don't have to represent them at all. :)
Nov
18
comment How does Haskell actually define the + function?
That definition of RealReal is not very good if you want computable arithmetic.
Nov
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
18
answered How does Haskell actually define the + function?
Nov
17
comment Calculating expressions modulo n
Did you bother checking out the link? It has the paper, and also an implementation. There is also a README file that describes what the files contain.
Nov
17
comment What is the fastest error monad in haskell?
Those are not really build in monads the way ST is. The ST monad has compiler support, whereas the monads you mention is just regular Haskell code.
Nov
17
answered Calculating expressions modulo n