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Jun
18
comment Why discarded values are () instead of ⊥ in Haskell?
Listen to @luqui, he's given you the answer.
Jun
18
comment Any methods for recovering enough laziness to tie the knot in a monad?
@JohnL Sounds like time travel. :)
Jun
18
comment How do exceptions in Haskell work?
@Peaker I think you're right. I don't think ghc should optimize this expression if they want to play by the rules laid out in the imprecise exceptions paper.
Jun
16
comment How do I link C++/Ogre3D code to Haskell
That sounds like some ghc runtime system symbol.
Jun
16
comment How do I link C++/Ogre3D code to Haskell
How can the exported C wrapper have a name with "::"? That's not C. Haskell can only call C not C++, so make sure your wrapper exports all the functions you need as C function and call those.
Jun
15
comment the seq function and strictness
Except that that Haskell does not evaluate a.
Jun
12
comment GADTs vs. MultiParamTypeClasses
GADTs don't offer anything that could not be simulated by existential types and type equality. But your particular example is not an instance of this.
Jun
10
comment Text.Printf with Data.Text?
I'll add a Text.Printf.Internal module to expose all the type classes and types involved.
Jun
10
comment Text.Printf with Data.Text?
Get the printf package and export the PrintfArg class and use that instead of the usual package.
Jun
9
comment Haskell: duplicated functions (+) and (++), mappend
Numbers form a Monoid in many different ways. And if you add mmultiply to the Monoid class then it's no longer a monoid. As far as (++) and mappend they could indeed be the same. And in an older version of Haskell they were. The reason to keep (++) working on only lists was pedagogical; it was felt too many type classes for simple operations was difficult for beginners. That's also why fmap is not called map.
Jun
9
comment Why isn't every type part of Eq in Haskell?
@L01man No. Here's what I mean. Say that implement a Set type by data Set a = Set [a]. Then I define an Eq instance that says that two sets are equal if the have the same elements regardless of order. Now, if you could compare the sets in some other way that actually looks at the representation you'd be able to see that some sets that I want you to think are equal are actually represented by differently. Perhaps you rely on that. If I then change the representation of Set to have a unique representation your code would break. Using just == you would be safe.
Jun
9
comment Why isn't every type part of Eq in Haskell?
The first Haskell standard actually prescribed that if you omitted the deriving clause for a data type you would get as many classes as possible derived. This was later changed because it was somewhat unpredictable what classes would be derived.
Jun
9
comment Why isn't every type part of Eq in Haskell?
@L01man Having another operator that compares if two values are "exactly the same" would break abstraction. I might have an abstract data type (e.g. a set implemented by a list) where I want to consider several internal representations as being the same. If you were allowed to compare my internal representations you would be able to write code that could break when I change the internals of my data type. So it's important to have control over equality not only from a theoretical perspective, but also from a practical one.
Jun
9
comment What's so bad about OverlappingInstances?
@illissius I didn't say it was an easy bug to fix, but still just an implementation bug. If GeneralizedNewtypeDeriving constructed real instances instead of playing tricks with type coercions this bug would not occur (which is how I implemented it 10 years ago in Bluespec).
Jun
8
comment What's so bad about OverlappingInstances?
The badness about GeneralizedNewtypeDeriving is an implementation bug. There's nothing bad about this extension as such, but ghc allows it in cases where it should be banned.
Jun
5
comment How to apply a polymorphic function to a Dynamic value
@AndreasRossberg It's very small. :) But the former is somewhat more robust. For instance, if the implementation of Dynamic changes so the TypeRep and Any fields change place the former would still work while the latter crashes.
Jun
5
comment How to apply a polymorphic function to a Dynamic value
Lying about the TypeRep is ingenious, so I'll accept this answer (using unsafeCoerce to peek&poke inside Dynamic does not qualify as sane).
Jun
4
comment Is my program Turing-complete?
First, I assume your solution set is ordered in some fashion when it's presented. (Otherwise you'd not see anything interesting.) If so, why isn't the normal order reduction the first one to appear?
Jun
4
comment Is my program Turing-complete?
Oh, and your SKI implementation is all the proof I need that it's Turing complete.
Jun
4
comment Is my program Turing-complete?
What happens if one reduction order does not terminate while another one does? Do you get the terminating one?