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22m
comment C/C++, Programming
@JoachimPileborg In this particular case, both C and C++ are identical. The answer in both cases involved mktime.
24m
comment I can't use if ( ifs == NULL) command in VS 2013
@TonyD A for is designed to have a definition (in its first part); it's expected. For the rest, doing two things is a single statement is obfuscation, and wouldn't pass code review at any of the places I've worked.
53m
comment saving, manipulating and restoring std::ios_base::fmtflags
My mistake. It should be std::basic_ios<char> for the stream type. (My actual code is relatively old, and uses a typedef here, so I didn't see the actual type.)
54m
revised saving, manipulating and restoring std::ios_base::fmtflags
added 21 characters in body
56m
comment I can't use if ( ifs == NULL) command in VS 2013
@TonyD Putting a definition in a condition definitely adds to the confusion, regardless of what it is. And I've worked in a lot of different shops, over 20 years, and read a lot of different articles, and this is the first time I've seen anyone put the definition in an if.
58m
comment In what situation you must work on a debug build?
In most Windows applications, people have two build configurations because that's what VS gives you by default; they've never thought about it. If you think about it, then you end up with what I said: you don't want to deliver something different than what you've actually developed, tested and debugged. You may have to, for performance reasons, but it's always a less than ideal solution. (Of course, if you're doing fancy graphics, which is common in a lot of Windows applications, you may have performance issues.)
1h
comment In what situation you must work on a debug build?
@EdChum It's a lot less of a pain than going through hundreds of projects, modifying each one at a time. The project files are more or less standard XML, with in addition a very clean formatting, so are easy to edit directly; about the only modifications I do to them under VS is add and remove files. (I use a Python script to generate a new empty project file, with all of my includes, etc. as I want them.)
2h
comment In what situation you must work on a debug build?
@EdChum Both VS projects and makefiles support include, in one way or another, and if you have more than one project, each should include a properties file with the settings you use. There's really no other way of ensuring that all projects have compatible settings.
2h
answered In what situation you must work on a debug build?
2h
comment I can't use if ( ifs == NULL) command in VS 2013
@TonyD I've never seen anyone put the definition of the stream directly in the if. No point in adding to the confusion.
3h
comment I can't use if ( ifs == NULL) command in VS 2013
The idiomatic check is if ( !ifs ). if ( ifs == NULL ) is guaranteed to have the same effect in C++03, but this was mainly due to historical reasons (but also the absence of explicit on conversion operators).
3h
comment dynamic library vs static library at runtime
@n.m. Actually, you may want static linking with plugins as well. Because you typically want each plug-in to be completely autonomous, with no accidentally shared state with other plugins.
3h
comment dynamic library vs static library at runtime
@n.m. It depends on the application domain. If you're writing plug-ins, then obviously, you need dynamic libraries. If you're writing applications, with your own executable, you only want them for things like system libraries; you want the executable to be as monolithic as possible, in order to avoid DLL-hell.
4h
comment dynamic library vs static library at runtime
@n.m. An object owns state, not a library. In general, dynamic linking just offers an additional source of errors. It should be avoided except in the cases where it brings some concrete advantage.
18h
comment dynamic library vs static library at runtime
@n.m. Actually, it's usually simpler and preferable to use static libraries for everything but the system interfaces and plugins.
18h
comment dynamic library vs static library at runtime
In the compiler/linker documentation. But isn't OS X just a dialect of Unix. If so, there should be no problem.
19h
answered dynamic library vs static library at runtime
20h
answered saving, manipulating and restoring std::ios_base::fmtflags
23h
comment How to implement classic sorting algorithms in modern C++?
@sbabbi The entire standard library is based on the principle that iterators are cheap to copy; it passes them by value, for example. If copying an iterator isn't cheap, then you're going to suffer performance problems everywhere.
23h
comment Copy on write proper usage?
Except that the posted code doesn't work, because the const-ness it uses to determine whether to copy isn't that of the pointed to object, but that of the pointer. So you can't pass a CoWPtr<T> const& to a function which might modify the object, but if you call a const function on a non-const pointer, it will do the copy.