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Sep
2
accepted How can I break only on unhandled Exceptions in ContinueWith?
Apr
2
answered How can I break only on unhandled Exceptions in ContinueWith?
Apr
1
revised How can I break only on unhandled Exceptions in ContinueWith?
Reformatted code whitespace to have less indentation
Apr
1
comment How can I break only on unhandled Exceptions in ContinueWith?
"that's a somewhat different question than previously asked" I'm not sure how; the original question has an observed Exception that I don't want the debugger to break on and an unobserved Exception that I do want the debugger to break on. "you handle the TaskScheduler.UnobservedTaskException" It seems like this would be a good solution, but the problem appears to be that this event only fires when the Task's finalizer is called, which might not happen for a very long time after the Exception occurs; I will update the question to show why this is not an acceptable solution.
Mar
31
comment How can I break only on unhandled Exceptions in ContinueWith?
"I still see the debugger break on each thrown exception even with the waits" Disable "Just My Code" and you'll see the desired behavior. Enable it and you'll see the behavior you describe. "Why would you run the code unattended, but with the debugger attached" Because it takes a few hours to run (during which time I want to do something else), but I still want to have access to the debugging environment when I come back and find that something has gone wrong (just like if the Unintentional Exception occurred in non-TPL code, or in ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem)
Mar
31
comment How can I break only on unhandled Exceptions in ContinueWith?
TPL is supposed to be as close to writing normal code as possible. In normal code, if I have an Exception that isn't handled anywhere, I expect the debugger to break on that exception, and then the process to terminate. I expect the same behavior from an Exception that isn't handled anywhere in TPL. The root of the question is how I can catch bugs in background (unobserved) ContinueWiths. It looks like your statement that I simply can't do what I want is true, and I see that as a serious drawback of TPL (even though I'm sure there were good technical reasons for making that design decision).
Mar
31
comment How can I break only on unhandled Exceptions in ContinueWith?
I've removed the confusing WriteLine; thanks. However, it seems like the main difference between your code and mine is the presence of Wait(). If I append .Wait() to each of my final ContinueWith clauses, I do get the desired behavior. But, that also makes them run synchronously which is undesirable; I want them in the background. The root of the question is how I can catch bugs in background (unWaited and un-awaited) ContinueWiths without having them swallowed. Using Just My Code might work, but then I can never run code unattended that allows an Exception to cross a ContinueWith boundary.
Mar
31
revised How can I break only on unhandled Exceptions in ContinueWith?
Removed the misleading line printed at the bottom
Mar
31
asked How can I break only on unhandled Exceptions in ContinueWith?
Feb
24
comment How to Add 'Comments' to a JPEG File Using C#
A reference to System.Xaml is also necessary
Nov
20
awarded  Yearling
Sep
17
comment Why does the Bitmap(Image) constructor change PixelFormat?
Well, that's for BitmapImage (different namespace) -- I'm just thinking the intention could be similar here
Sep
17
comment Why does the Bitmap(Image) constructor change PixelFormat?
Does Microsoft actually acknowledge this as a bug? It could be intended behavior as in stackoverflow.com/a/15228818/651139
Sep
17
asked Why does the Bitmap(Image) constructor change PixelFormat?
Sep
2
awarded  Critic
Sep
2
comment Mock GPS location issue
To get mock locations working, I also had to run location.setElapsedRealtimeNanos(SystemClock.elapsedRealtimeNanos()). This is in the example code on the Google website, but it isn't mentioned in the documentation. If I do not set this (minAPI=17) property, mock locations fail silently on my Galaxy S5 running 4.4.2
Sep
1
comment Why does HttpListener ignore external requests?
By the definition of a firewall, there must be a firewall exception for the port you want to use. The difficulty here was that HttpListener uses something outside your program to listen on port 80, so simply allowing a firewall exception for your program is not sufficient for HttpListener to be allowed to listen for connections.
Aug
29
comment Windows 7 progress bar in taskbar in C#?
This is an amazingly fantastic answer; no external dependencies or downloads, and just works
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
4
awarded  Popular Question