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bio website stackoverflow.com/users/65299
location Seattle, WA
age 32
visits member for 5 years, 5 months
seen 1 hour ago

artificial intelligence software engineer


Aug
4
comment Scala applets - SimpleApplet demo
@Daniel -- I surprised myself when I "proved" you could override a val with a def in the interpreter. Turned out I had forgotten to extend the trait that defined the val. :) I'm glad that's not actually possible!
Aug
4
revised Scala applets - SimpleApplet demo
added comment about using val/var to implement def
Aug
4
revised Comparing String and Enumeration
removed unnecessary complexity
Aug
4
revised Dynamic casting in Java
added conversion code, adding missing semicolons (too much scala programming!)
Aug
4
answered Dynamic casting in Java
Aug
4
answered Comparing String and Enumeration
Aug
4
comment Comparing String and Enumeration
What's the context / use case for the comparison? Pattern matching may provide a better solution, but it really depends on what you're trying to accomplish.
Aug
3
revised Using traits with a factory
added heading
Aug
3
comment Using traits with a factory
I extended your solution to enable code like val xerxes = Avatar[Elf]("Xerxes")
Aug
3
answered Using traits with a factory
Aug
3
comment Using traits with a factory
@olle: does scaladudes.com/node/15 help?
Aug
3
answered Possible for IDE's to resolve Scala classes in Java using Maven?
Aug
2
answered Scala applets - SimpleApplet demo
Aug
1
comment How can you inherit a generic factory method?
No, you can use the SeqProxy trait to get those methods for free: class Persons (val self: Seq[Person]) extends SeqProxy[Person]
Aug
1
comment How can you inherit a generic factory method?
Don't know whether you're still interested in this, but... The reason for that compiler error is that the newBuilder method is generic -- saying def newBuilder[Person]: Builder[Person, Persons] ... is no different from def newBuilder[X]: Builder[X, Persons] .... On a separate note, I added to my solution to show how you can abstract away the underlying collection implementation (trying to learn higher-kinded types).
Aug
1
revised How can you inherit a generic factory method?
corrected example averageAge method
Aug
1
revised How can you inherit a generic factory method?
generalized solution
Jul
31
comment How can you inherit a generic factory method?
Inheritance is a bad idea in practice in this case because it ties you to a particular collection implementation. Suppose you find out that for a particular group of Persons, you need to be able to quickly (i.e. in constant time) determine whether a Person is in that group. Clearly, ArrayBuffer would be a horrible choice for this use case. If you use composition, on the other hand, the methods in your Persons class can apply equally well whether the underlying collection is a Set or an ArrayBuffer.
Jul
31
revised How can you inherit a generic factory method?
extend Proxy so that equals will work as expected
Jul
31
comment How can you inherit a generic factory method?
You can't extend an object because it defines an instance rather than a type. This analogy might help -- you can have sub-categories of SoftwareEngineer (say, JavaHacker), but it doesn't make sense to talk about sub-categories of Martin Fowler. In the same way, it doesn't make sense to extend an instance.