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34287
bio website stackoverflow.com/users/65299
location Seattle, WA
age 33
visits member for 6 years, 1 month
seen 1 hour ago

artificial intelligence software engineer


Jun
23
comment Issue in comparison different list in Scala
It wasn't clear what you were asking since your code didn't compile. I edited it, but please verify that it still expresses your intent. Also, please see the help center for tips on how to ask a good question.
Jun
21
comment Why does this Scalaz 7 enumerator leak memory?
I've determined that this answer is awesome for at least two reasons: first, because it finally helped me understand why this happens and why it's not a compiler bug, and second, because the advice to simplify was so spot-on. I had simplified the scalaz code just because it didn't make sense to me -- but I didn't realize at the time that the simplification alone would have fixed the leak! Bounty to you, sir!
Jun
20
comment Why does this Scalaz 7 enumerator leak memory?
just saw your updates. Regarding the second update, the commit history of EnumeratorT.scala might be informative. Specifically, these commits. ;-)
Jun
20
comment Type inference when creating a partially applied function
@om-nom-nom except that there's no polymorphism here...
Jun
20
comment Why does C# disallow readonly local variables?
FWIW, Scala distinguishes local readonly/final values from variables with its val and var keywords. In Scala code, local vals are used very frequently (and are, in fact, preferred over local vars). I suspect that the primary reasons that the final modifier is not used more frequently in Java are a) clutter and b) laziness.
Jun
19
comment Why does this Scalaz 7 enumerator leak memory?
The suggested implementation is not equivalent, by the way. It's essential for the Iterator to be a by-name argument in order to use enumIterator1 in functional code. Unlike Iterators, Enumerators are reusable, so correct usage of enumIterator1 involves passing a function that constructs an Iterator rather than passing the Iterator itself.
Jun
19
comment Why does this Scalaz 7 enumerator leak memory?
That makes some sense, I suppose, but it seems like it must be a compiler bug then. Closures shouldn't hold references that they never use. Thanks for tracking this down. I plan to verify your explanation within the next couple days, then award the tick and bounty.
Jun
19
comment Why does this Scalaz 7 enumerator leak memory?
I'm trying to follow that chain of closures, and I can't wrap my head around the second step. Why does the anonymous function argument of mapCont get closed over by the by-name argument to enumIterator1? (I assume you meant enumIterator1 rather than enumIterator)
Jun
17
comment Scala - foreach is not a member of Int
It's unfortunate that this is marked as the answer, since it doesn't even attempt to answer the question (and it answers another question that should be asked more directly/succinctly).
Jun
16
comment Scala - foreach is not a member of Int
Please replace your code with a minimal example that exhibits the error. As it stands, this question has little lasting value and should probable be closed -- for someone who runs into the same error, the code sample is overly convoluted. For someone looking to compute an average in Scala, a simpler, more direct question would be better.
Jun
13
comment Function signature for returning a function with generics and implicits?
This may also be of interest: chuusai.com/2012/05/10/shapeless-polymorphic-function-values-2
Jun
13
comment Function signature for returning a function with generics and implicits?
foo is a method, not a function. See stackoverflow.com/questions/2529184/…. I point this out not to be pedantic, but because it's of critical importance to your question.
Jun
13
comment Client processing vs Server processing
This question can't really be answered in the absence of a more precise definition of "performance".
May
27
comment Importing in Scala - How to add a jar to the classpath permanently
Please include code for your script and build. It sounds like there might be a number of misunderstandings here, but it's hard to tell without specifics.
May
23
comment scala: memoize a function no matter how many arguments the function takes?
@acjay I agree that it's somewhat unfortunate that this requires changing your method to a function value (or at least introducing a function value to delegate to), but it's an unavoidable consequence of the fact that Memoize(f) constructs a new function value / lookup table each time it's called. It's essential that we only call it once (per function we memoize) and store the resulting function value in a val or lazy val, or the benefit of memoization would be lost.
May
23
comment scala: memoize a function no matter how many arguments the function takes?
@acjay That was confusing on my part -- if fn is a two-arg method, then the _ is necessary to "partially apply" it (i.e., turn it into a two-arg function value). If fn is already a two-arg function, you could just write Memoize(fn).
May
23
comment scala: memoize a function no matter how many arguments the function takes?
@acjay This example assumes fn is some existing, slow, two-argument function (perhaps also a private member) -- memoFn would be the memoized version of fn and myMethod would be the public API that delegates to memoFn. Both parameters (p1 and p2) are used. Maybe I was misunderstanding your comment about a descriptive API?
May
22
comment scala: memoize a function no matter how many arguments the function takes?
@acjay If the computation were part of a class's public API, one could make the memoized function private and then expose it via a method: private lazy val memoFn = Memoize(fn _); def myMethod(p1: A, p2: B): C = memoFn(p1, p2)
May
6
comment Converting .jks to p12
Note that supplying the passwords directly in the command is not a secure practice in general (as noted in the keytool manpage) as the passwords could then be read from your command history or observed with ps. If you omit a password, the tool should prompt you for it.
Apr
28
comment Is it possible in Scala to force the caller to specify a type parameter for a polymorphic method?
@drozzy I added an explanation to the answer -- briefly, the LowPriorityDefaultsTo trait is necessary to avoid ambiguity since either default or overrideDefault could provide an object of type DefaultsTo[A, A]. Putting overrideDefault in a trait causes the compiler to prefer default in any situation where either method would do.