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Jul
31
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
28
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
19
comment Limits of (soft real-time) timing requirements in Windows OS
@BillyONeal I stand corrected. What I had in my head is that the time to heap allocate isn't constant, which I agree is of no matter in this case (GC behavior was out of question anyway).
Jul
19
comment Limits of (soft real-time) timing requirements in Windows OS
That's not really a good example though imho. Audio processing is always buffered. The CPU is only involved when the buffer is full and has to react in time before the DMA or similar mechanism needs to reload again. Without ASIO or similar, that's typically in the 100ms area. With ASIO, you can go sub 10ms, but if the CPU happens to be busy and not be able to respond in time, you'll hear crackles.
Jul
12
accepted C type naming conventions, _t or ALLCAPS
Jul
12
comment Linq datetime date match in query c#
I'd definitely go with this answer. Not only is its performance much better than the other one. This operation behaves atomically in respect to the date, as pointed out already. When executing this on new year's eve, you do not want some results of the current year and some of the next (or last, depending how you see it) year. You'd generally expect the function to behave atomically in this respect, i.e. that is is executed at a precise point in time, not over a timespan.
Jul
12
revised “Closure over variable gives slightly worse performance”. How?
typo.
Jul
12
answered “Closure over variable gives slightly worse performance”. How?
Jul
11
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
5
comment Does the location of a lambda expression matter in Lazy Initialization?
Regarding your follow-up question: It is simply not a good idea to field initializers depend on the order of initialization, at all. If you need to follow a logical order, use a constructor. It is impossible for the compiler to guess the correct order in each and every situation. As you mentioned, this can very easily lead to bugs if another programmer decides to do some refactoring, or something that would normally have no effect.
Jul
5
comment how to assign same event to different objects?
A suitable depends on "how different" the differences are. If an additional parameter would do (as it looks like in your example), you could capture the variable in a lambda expression which you attach to the event handler. If there's a whole different action to be taken, your question is logically flawed: You want to attach the same event handler, but it should do different things. Whether and how this case can be solved elegantly depends on the details. Your vague description of "complex logic" doesn't even make it clear if generalizing it with merely a for loop is even appropriate.
Jul
5
comment C# IDisposable pattern and throwing ObjectDisposedException
IDisposable can even be useful in situations where "resources" in the classic sense aren't even involved. For example, a transaction system where you wrap a bunch of commands in a using block, and they are all executed at once when the object is disposed (i.e. the transaction object goes out of the using scope). You could see the transaction itself as the resource. IDisposable and using is the best way in C# to develop RAII-like patterns and something similar to deterministic "destruction", and those have been shown to have a very wide range of use cases.
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
15
comment How can I make a child object aware of the property name to which it is assigned on its parent?
"it transfers a functionality to the Parent that really belongs to the Child." I disagree with that statement (IMO it belongs to the parent), and so does the C# language as it seems. That may be why you are having so much trouble. Alternative: Maybe you can create a "Container<T> class (or struct)" which is similar to Nullable<T>. In your parent class, you use properties of this class instead of normal properties. The constructor of Container<T> takes a name as argument, and when its value is assigned, it copies its name to the value.
Apr
7
comment Why .join is still necessary when all other thread have finished before the main thread?
What makes you so certain that the two threads [EDIT: always] finish before the main thread?
Apr
2
comment An Issue With Writing In A File In C#
Use using. You are not closing your writer.
Mar
31
comment Creating List with non-knowing type
possible duplicate of Is it impossible to use Generics dynamically?
Mar
21
comment Visual Studio Disabling Missing XML Comment Warning
@binki If you're suggesting that Visual Studio lacks this feature, I completely agree with you.
Mar
18
comment Visitor pattern. Is void* an acceptable return type for a completely abstract interface?
@d11wtq I've put a lot of thought into this since you've asked the question, and I had also tried to solve this very problem (converting between arbitrary polymorphic object graphs in a 100% type-safe manner) before, but with little success. It boils down to either having a visitor with as many generic type arguments as there are visit methods, or returning void* (whose C# equivalent object is used in other code bases, for example the SharpDevelop AST). Though I'm not done thinking and might edit this answer later with some more in-depth analysis.
Mar
16
answered Visitor pattern. Is void* an acceptable return type for a completely abstract interface?