Reputation
17,549
Top tag
Next privilege 20,000 Rep.
Access 'trusted user' tools
Badges
4 30 71
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~249k people reached

20h
revised How do I pass arguments to a Python script with IronPython
edited title
21h
revised Most efficient way to find the nearest number in a list
added 60 characters in body
21h
revised Most efficient way to find the nearest number in a list
edited body
21h
revised Most efficient way to find the nearest number in a list
edited body
21h
revised Most efficient way to find the nearest number in a list
added 6 characters in body
21h
comment Most efficient way to find the nearest number in a list
That's not going to work, since the query can be anything: you could query for 2'000'000'000+: you're going to construct a hashmap with more than 4GiB of elements? Will take all memory. Furthermore worst case a hashmap has a time complexity of O(n). Furthermore the setup setup phase will take a lot of time.
21h
revised Most efficient way to find the nearest number in a list
deleted 13 characters in body
21h
comment Most efficient way to find the nearest number in a list
@Christian.tucker: what should be returned if such number does not exists. For instance if you query 0?
21h
answered Most efficient way to find the nearest number in a list
21h
comment Most efficient way to find the nearest number in a list
@SterlingArcher: the example seems to imply the list is already sorted. Furthermore in case you are going to do a lot of queries, sorting the list first, will pay off in the end.
21h
comment Most efficient way to find the nearest number in a list
@SterlingArcher: but if the array is sorted, you can do this in logarithmic time. Which outperforms linear time nearly always and with huge difference.
22h
revised Clean Git Repository using gitignore
added 68 characters in body
22h
awarded  Nice Answer
1d
comment Is the execution time of this unique string function reduced from the naive O(n^2) approach?
That was indeed a small error, should be fixed now. I think you better remove this answer because some people will start flagging this for being a comment and not an answer...
1d
revised Is the execution time of this unique string function reduced from the naive O(n^2) approach?
added 1 character in body
1d
revised Is the execution time of this unique string function reduced from the naive O(n^2) approach?
added 16 characters in body
1d
revised Is the execution time of this unique string function reduced from the naive O(n^2) approach?
added 1858 characters in body
1d
comment Is the execution time of this unique string function reduced from the naive O(n^2) approach?
So his/her algorithm is indeed O(n)...
1d
comment Is the execution time of this unique string function reduced from the naive O(n^2) approach?
The algorithm solves this implicitly by returning 0 from the moment it finds a duplicate. Although it is not an intelligent algorithm; it benefits from the pigeonhole argument as a side-effect.
1d
comment Is the execution time of this unique string function reduced from the naive O(n^2) approach?
@Tim3880: as said before. You don't have to. Let's assume we take ASCII as alphabet. That alphabet contains 255 valid characters (\0 is not a valid one). Now if the scout gets as far as let's say 4 characters: we know the first 3 only occurred once in the string. Otherwise we would have returned 0 earlier. So that means the string reads something like abcde.... But if we reach the 255-th and the string is longer. We know it will return 0: simply because we know the first characters were different, and there are only 255 characters, we know there is at least one duplicate.