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visits member for 5 years, 9 months
seen Sep 4 '12 at 18:13

Sep
4
answered Detecting mouse courser when is close to polyline
Sep
4
revised Detecting mouse courser when is close to polyline
added 271 characters in body
Sep
4
answered Detecting mouse courser when is close to polyline
May
21
accepted Does win32 TextOut() complete asynchronously?
May
17
comment Does win32 TextOut() complete asynchronously?
Not really the question Ulterior... the question is if TextOut() completes asynchronously. We have applications that use DirectDraw, Direct3D, GDI... each have their place.
May
17
revised Does win32 TextOut() complete asynchronously?
added 8 characters in body
May
17
asked Does win32 TextOut() complete asynchronously?
Apr
17
answered is d3d 11 backwards compatible with d3d10 and d3d9?
Apr
17
revised efficiency and usage of dynamic vertex buffers in d3d
added 75 characters in body
Apr
17
comment efficiency and usage of dynamic vertex buffers in d3d
msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/…
Apr
17
comment efficiency and usage of dynamic vertex buffers in d3d
msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… - seems to hint that dynamic is stored for fast CPU access (easy updates) and static is stored for faster GPU access (but not easily accessible to CPU for updates).
Apr
17
comment efficiency and usage of dynamic vertex buffers in d3d
Honestly - have been studying the same thing, so can not say I know for sure... but my best answer I can give is: If vertexes will be constant - use static as the hardware will not have to worry about frequent memory updates and will render fast Else - use dynamic and the memory updates will be faster, but the rendering will not be as fast.. Again, I hope someone gives a concrete answer, been wondering the same thing and going with my assumptions above.
Apr
17
answered efficiency and usage of dynamic vertex buffers in d3d
Apr
17
comment What advantages are there to developing a Win32 app in C++ over a .NET app in C#?
I still regularly develop in c++ win32 - including brand new applications. Most of our programs are graphical in nature with very few stock UI functions. I find people who curse non-managed memory just are often just repeating what they have heard, and not actually experienced in c++. I prefer to be "closer to the hardware" in order to optimize certain algorithms. Also, I will correct one big misconception - the learning curve for win32 is LESS than .NET and C# (given you are experienced in c++). See - charlespetzold.com/pw5/index.html. +win32 installs/runs easily all win vers.
Feb
21
awarded  Commentator
Feb
21
comment How can I find the largest item in a linked list recursively given the head node?
+1 for all the reasons recursion is a bad idea in this case.
Feb
21
comment How can I find the largest item in a linked list recursively given the head node?
Ok - fixed end of list issue. I have seen two schools of thought on the homework questions 1) answer it anyways so stack overflow has the question answered -or- 2) try to educate the student rather than handing out an answer.... Which is it supposed to be?
Feb
21
revised How can I find the largest item in a linked list recursively given the head node?
added 52 characters in body
Feb
21
revised How can I find the largest item in a linked list recursively given the head node?
added 1 characters in body; added 45 characters in body
Feb
21
revised How can I find the largest item in a linked list recursively given the head node?
added 263 characters in body; added 267 characters in body