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Nov
10
comment Monad with no wrapped value?
@Jarrett I meant that in your example the "not wrapping a value" part is not usefull (since anything that does this is Useless) but that for your example a writer monad is what you want.
Nov
10
comment Monad with no wrapped value?
freed is exactly the greatest fixed point of a functor. In other words, freed f is just an arbitrary co-inductive data type and has nothing else special about it.
Oct
31
comment Tail function for “safe list” using GADTs
note: this is exactly the same as encoding the length in the type, since the index here is exactly the type of natural numbers.
Oct
23
comment What does $ mean / do in Haskell?
Technical note: AFAIK, the definition of $ is a bit of a lie at present. GHC actually treats it as syntax so that the runST $ do idiom works (except in things like sections where it really is a function). It should be just a function, but higher rank types are a problem.
Oct
22
comment Haskell - How do you prepend a bytestring with its length in binary?
also: don't worry about performance--it should be specialized away
Oct
13
comment Closed type families don’t work as expected
don't have GHC HEAD handy so can't check myself right now, but what happens if you put the two clauses in the other order?
Sep
30
comment Scala's style val in Haskell
fib () = 0 : 1 : zipWith (+) fib (tail fib) is broken. Perhaps you meant fib () = 0 : 1 : zipWith (+) (fib ()) (tail (fib ()))? But that doesn't memoize. fib () = let x = 0 : 1 : zipWith (+) x (tail x) in x is probably what you want, but the content of the let expression might get lifted by an unfriendly compiler which would cause unwanted sharing.
Sep
25
comment Enforced pattern order
@wit the edit gives exact matching. So no.
Sep
25
comment Enforced pattern order
@ThomasEding. I should have thought of that. You can also get it to typecheck even with NoMonomorphismRestriction enabled if you use abstraction instead of let to avoid generalization viewColors (Card s) = flip ($) reify (\a -> if s == (Set.fromList . toColors $ a) then (Just a) else Nothing) has the infered type viewColors :: ToColors a => Card -> Maybe a which is exactly what you want
Sep
21
comment Machine learning in OCaml or Haskell?
@JonHarrop That is possible, but I think this is a bit silly. First of all, "absolute performance" difference is not the right metric--since it depends on both the comparison function and the size of the data to be sorted. Also, the "my first mergesort" works with linked lists, which will add a huge performance cost to the C code also. Something like QSort is fast, but not that as fast as a non generic sort because of all the dynamic calls to the comparison function (std::sort in C++ avoids this problem, as can the Haskell with a specialize pragma). So? Optimized code tends to be faster...
Sep
20
comment Why there isn't a Functor instance for Kleisli in Control.Arrow?
I don't understand how this helps answer the question at all
Aug
23
comment encoding binary numerals in lambda calculus
Technically this is Boehm-Berarducci encoding. Church encoding targets the untyped lambda calculus. When you BB encode a type into the polymorphic lambda calculus you get functions both way forming an isomorphism. Nothing of the sort is possible with Church encoding. To figure out the Church encoding, just take the terms and ignore the types
Aug
18
comment Unzip in one pass?
@MathematicalOrchid case x of ~y -> z is just the same as let y = (case x of y -> y) in z. If you are binding multiple variables spin out the thing you a matching on (the x here) as a let to produce sharing and then replicate the pattern match for each variable. Pattern matching in a let is just lazy matching also, so we can't use that, but this translation works.
Aug
13
comment How do I extract information from inner parameters in Haskell?
although this might be inhabited at a specific type (exactly when that specific type is inhabited). The type forall a. ((a -> Void) -> Void) -> a is not inhabited in intuitionistic settings (Haskell) but is in classical ones.
Aug
13
comment How do I extract information from inner parameters in Haskell?
@EarthEngine it is a special case, hence it is not isomorphic. The type (forall b. (a -> b) -> b) -> a is isomorphic to a because the quantification is not in prenex position (although proving it is really an isomorphism turns out to be semi-advanced). The type ((a -> ()) -> ()) -> a would say ((a -> True) -> True) -> a) but since const () has type ((a -> () -> ()) (the first part is a tautology) this is the same as the type forall a. a which is uninhabited.
Aug
13
comment How do I extract information from inner parameters in Haskell?
type (a,b) = (a->b->())->() that is not even close to being true. Haskell is pure. The correct encoding whould be forall r. (a -> b -> r) -> r. You have the same problem with getFromDoubleAccepter :: ((a -> ()) -> ()) -> a which is uninhabited in the total fragment of the language.
Aug
7
comment Functors and Applicatives for types of kind (* -> *) -> *
the difference is that you are defining endo-functors, while the OP is defining functors from some category where objects have kind * -> * (perhaps this should be the category of endo functors on Hask) to Hask.
Jul
19
comment Is this incremental parser a functor, if so how would `fmap` be implemented?
Dan Fisher explained it. I just always annotate variables with variances in my head. Since it is the argument to a function Input a -> Output a b is in a contra-variant position. Therefore Output a b is in a contra-variant position. Since the second argument of that type is covariant, you have a b in a contra-variant location and can't have a functor. Sorry.
Jul
18
comment Is this incremental parser a functor, if so how would `fmap` be implemented?
ParserI is not a functor. No instance exists.
Jun
29
comment Where do values fit in Category of Hask?
actually...the integers could be regarded as a category in other ways--for example they are a total order. But, there are also ways of regarding all types as categories such that all function are functorial. The most famous is perhaps to to look at the category induced by the partial order of "definedness" on each type (this is the approach of denotational semantics). You might also think of "sets" or "types" as "discrete categories" where all the arrows are identities--in which case all functions are functors, but then this generalizes to "higher inductive types" a la HoTT.