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Apr
3
comment Is Hask locally small?
@edeast that is interesting. I think I was remembering this hal.inria.fr/docs/00/07/62/61/PDF/RR-0296.pdf paper
Apr
3
comment Is Hask locally small?
um...that is not how it works. The fact that all programs are finite does not make the universe of programs countable. Skolem's paradox here.
Mar
18
comment How to clear ghci's function result cache?
That is just lazy evaluation. In ML let f = some_computation would be evaluated once, when that line was first encountered. In Haskell it is computed at most once when it is actually needed.
Mar
15
comment How do I implement Reader using free monads?
I don't think it can be done without a function type somewhere.
Mar
14
comment The “reader” monad
@GabrielGonzalez sure, and that lets you do interesting things, you then have to build the reader monad in what ever category you are working with instead of Hask. A comonoid is just a monoid in the opposite category, so we could just define a single monoid class and be done.
Mar
14
comment The “reader” monad
many "monads" are not even monads up to equivalence, but only up to an ordering relation! That is, you have to rewrite the laws in terms of some "less than or equal to" operator. Many, like some versions of state, were real monads until we introduced seq which broke essentially all the monads. Even Id is probably not a monad because (.) and id don't form a category. I think that the correct theoretical thing is probably to reformulate all the laws in terms of 2-categories, and use 2-cells in place of equalities.
Mar
14
comment The “reader” monad
@DarkOtter assuming totality: delete must be const () right? So then we can show that fst . split = id and snd . split = id by the laws. This leads to the conclusion that we have only the one instance. If the language were not pure we might have more interesting ones.
Mar
13
comment Haskell space usage compile time restrictions
another possibility: last $ let ls = go i a in ls ++ ls. That should hold on to the list unless your compiler decides to reduce sharing.
Mar
13
comment Haskell space usage compile time restrictions
@pat an optimizing compiler could recognize that the cons cells wer only used once and free them immediately, that is true. I don't think this is part of the GHC cost model though--and certainly the general point holds. We can force arbitrary computation with a clever function--although perhaps here we need to stick a reverse to make that actually happen.
Mar
13
comment Haskell space usage compile time restrictions
oops. The original version didn't. Fixed. Anyways, the ideas is tt has to allocated an arbitrary long list.
Mar
10
comment Haskell Merging multiple lists
this is the correct (as in asymptotically optimal) solution.
Mar
10
comment Haskell Merging multiple lists
Imagine each sublist is a singleton, and they occur in reverse order, then this take O(n^2). You want to use a bottom up merge O(n log n). Since merge2 define a monoid, we can achieve this using a tree shaped implementation of foldM. The same problem applies to luqui's answer.
Mar
8
comment Haskell Prelude.head error, empty list
sine the error is Prelude.head I have to say this is unlikely
Mar
8
comment In Haskell, can you create an object of a class?
A Haskell type class most certainly is a class! It is a class (of types) in the mathematical sense of "not quite a set" or "defined by a predicate."
Mar
7
comment Break a list into sublists of the same length in Haskell
@dbaupp now fixed.
Feb
28
comment How to write gcast for type families?
not possible. Type families are not injective, and as such you can't solve the constraint from which them come in this way.
Feb
26
comment Haskell - Parameter count that fit criteria?
@Ingo Yep. I would have been first if I hadn't edited the question. :)
Feb
22
comment Haskell State example in wikibooks: fix per current Haskell?
I think those functions work with MTL version 2.12 (current). Why do you think they don't? Can you post the error you get when you try them (and your full code)?
Feb
22
comment Derive Eq and Show for type alias in Haskell
telling if two programs are existentially equivalent is trivially as hard as solving the halting problem. You have to know if a function halts to know that it is equal! Or, alternatively, solveHalting f = (\y -> seq (f x) y) == id. We know solveHalting can not exist by Turing's proof, so one gets no such Eq instance for functions.
Feb
20
comment Why is (a,b,c,d) not sugar for (a,(b,(c,(d,()))))?
@MikeIzbicki what about using a function (type class hackery time) and spaces, I could probably give you (makeHArray 1 'c' () "hello") :: Num a => HArray '[a,Char,(),String] which looks pretty good IMO. As to pattern matching, view patterns are about as good as makes sense semantically.