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 Yearling
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Feb
24
comment Large file support in C++
@savi: I'm not aware of a Visual Studio equivalent to _FILE_OFFSET_BITS=64. If you're not using a library that transparently handles the large file offsets for you, you'll likely have to roll your own code to achieve the same affect. For example, the discussion "Huge file access in C" from the comp.lang.c newsgroup describes one approach.
Feb
23
awarded  Yearling
Nov
18
comment Multiple files need a function?
Does the symbol correspond to a variable? If so, consider changing the design so that it isn't exposed through the header or mark it extern.
Nov
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
20
comment Legal definitions of main() in C++14
@TristanBrindle: Ah okay. Cool. :)
Oct
20
comment Legal definitions of main() in C++14
Out of curiosity, since int is the only legal return type why would anyone want to return auto for the main() function? What would that buy you?
Sep
23
comment Set connect timout using setsockopt in Linux
@GenerationDSystems: It looks like you can set the number of SYN retransmits at a socket granularity through something like the non-portable setsockopt(fd, IPPROTO_TCP, TCP_SYNCNT, &syn_cnt, sizeof(syn_cnt)) - see the tcp(7) man page - but I don't think that would get your connect timeout to less than 5 seconds since setting the TCP_SYNCNT to 1, for example, would give you something like 36 seconds, AFAICT. I've never tried this before, and just learned about it myself. YMMV.
Sep
22
comment Set connect timout using setsockopt in Linux
Ah okay, my mistake. AFAIK, there isn't a standard way to do that. What platform are you on? Here's one way to do it on Linux, for example: sekuda.com/…
Sep
19
comment Set connect timout using setsockopt in Linux
@GenerationDSystems: It seems odd that you'd need to set a socket option to make a non-blocking connect timeout at all. From what I understand connectToHost() should return immediately with no timeout, and emit the connected() signal once the connection has been established. I did find an old post about a similar problem to your own that implied it may have been a system/driver problem. Does the problem occur on other platforms?
Sep
19
answered Set connect timout using setsockopt in Linux
Sep
12
comment Odd characters in string output C++
One more for the null terminator: char day[4] = { 0 }
Jul
28
comment C/C++ pointer dereferencing
@avakar: Nice and concise point! Out of curiosity, have you ever seen code like 3[array] in the wild? Someone who hasn't seen that before would probably be quite confused. On related note, I once got hit with something like int i = ...; if ("fuzzbucket"[i] == ...) ... during an interview. That seemed rather obscure but the interviewer claimed it would be simpler to do that than access the characters in the string literal through a char const array.
Jul
23
answered Why is Python faster than C++ in this case?
May
29
comment What does 'const' do when used in a pointer to pointer rvalue const function argument?
This doesn't cover the OP's case. The OP was asking about a const rvalue reference to a non-const pointer to a non-const pointer to a non-const int.
May
29
revised What does 'const' do when used in a pointer to pointer rvalue const function argument?
deleted 207 characters in body
May
29
answered What does 'const' do when used in a pointer to pointer rvalue const function argument?
May
16
comment Algorithm to print asterisks for duplicate characters
@Jay My point was that the RB tree thing is an implementation detail, which the spec doesn't mandate. You implied otherwise. We can argue semantics ad nauseum, but I get what you were trying to say overall. I was just nitpicking. :)
May
16
comment Algorithm to print asterisks for duplicate characters
Your comment "stl map is a binary tree" is not entirely accurate. The standard doesn't dictate that a std::map be implemented as a binary tree. It only requires logarithmic lookup complexity, which is why it is often implemented with a Red-black tree under-the-hood.
May
7
comment Do I need to delete the pointer in the loop here?
Regarding shared_ptrs, I think far too many people automatically go with a shared_ptr even though shared semantics are unnecessary. A shared_ptr does have more overhead than a unique_ptr, for example, because of synchronization, etc. Make sure you actually need shared semantics before using a shared_ptr. If not, go with a unique_ptr.
May
1
answered Where are changes made by swap?