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Mar
13
comment pthread_create(3) and memory synchronization guarantee in SMP architectures
While this is interesting in itself, how common are ccNUMA systems actually? Wikipedia article about NUMA says about ccNUMA: "As of 2011, ccNUMA systems are multiprocessor systems based on the AMD Opteron processor, which can be implemented without external logic, and the Intel Itanium processor, which requires the chipset to support NUMA. [...] Earlier ccNUMA systems such as those from Silicon Graphics were based on MIPS processors and the DEC Alpha 21364 (EV7) processor."
Mar
13
comment Replace Assembler memory barrier woth pthreaad code
Your code kind of does not make much sense to me: you create and join a thread that immediately exits (the macro is never used). Are we missing something essential here? There is no apparent connection between your two code sniplets.
Mar
13
comment pthread_create(3) and memory synchronization guarantee in SMP architectures
As pthread_join is also in the list of POSIX library functions providing memory synchronization, it is also implied by common sense that when a thread returns it will also provide memory synchronization so that pthread_join gets returned data in good healthy up-to-date shape.
Mar
12
accepted pthread_create(3) and memory synchronization guarantee in SMP architectures
Mar
12
comment pthread_create(3) and memory synchronization guarantee in SMP architectures
"Otherwise there would be no point..." Exactly! When reading standards, need to also interpret using common sense.
Mar
12
revised pthread_create(3) and memory synchronization guarantee in SMP architectures
Reduced redundancy in the paraphrasing of the quoted standard text
Mar
12
revised pthread_create(3) and memory synchronization guarantee in SMP architectures
Provided concrete example
Mar
12
comment pthread_create(3) and memory synchronization guarantee in SMP architectures
Sorry for unclear first version of the question, and thanks for the contribution.
Mar
12
comment pthread_create(3) and memory synchronization guarantee in SMP architectures
In my mind the standard does not specify very coherently the memory synchronization semantics of the newly-created thread, hence the question, though thinking more of it, it would be madness to have implementation that does not guarantee the newly started thread is started without synchronizing with the calling thread.
Mar
12
comment pthread_create(3) and memory synchronization guarantee in SMP architectures
My originally posted question was not clear enough. I have clarified my question. It is only relevant to think of two threads (the one calling pthread_create() and the newly-created thread), though to have old memory value cached in the CPU core of the newly-started thread, there need to be unrelated thread having accessed the memory location.
Mar
12
comment pthread_create(3) and memory synchronization guarantee in SMP architectures
@nos - By my reading, pthread_create only synchronizes the calling thread. Though it would be insanity to need to assume the newly-created thread need memory syncronization before it can reliably access any data.
Mar
12
revised pthread_create(3) and memory synchronization guarantee in SMP architectures
made the question more exact about the synchronization
Mar
12
revised pthread_create(3) and memory synchronization guarantee in SMP architectures
clarified the example
Mar
12
asked pthread_create(3) and memory synchronization guarantee in SMP architectures
Mar
12
revised Cache memories in Multicore CPUs
typo fixes, formatting, removed empty talk according to preferred SO question format
Mar
12
suggested approved edit on Cache memories in Multicore CPUs
Mar
7
comment Do you use NULL or 0 (zero) for pointers in C++?
To tell the truth, I am surprised that Stroustrup's FAQ still — after birth of C++11 and C++ compiler communities and vendors having concluded this is not practical — says NULL macro is defined as 0. Coming to personal taste, I think NULL macro is an useless relic/idiom — almost as ridiculous as defining macros for (short) 0, (unsigned long long) 0, '\0', and so on (especially when we already have 0L, 0.0f, 0.0 etc defined by the core language).
Mar
7
revised C XML library for Embedded Systems
Formatting, typos fixed; using complete sentences.
Mar
7
suggested approved edit on C XML library for Embedded Systems
Mar
7
comment Do you use NULL or 0 (zero) for pointers in C++?
C++11 nullptr is a keyword and much robust than NULL which is a macro. Using nullptr - when available - should more widely amount to correct code across platforms whereas NULL could lead to surprises.