2,061 reputation
21223
bio website iiserk.net/~abhra
location Kolkata, India
age 25
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Nov 22 at 21:03

From Kolkata, India. Currently a Physics undergrad. I'm into programming, web development, graphic design, writing, photography, playing drums, football and swimming.

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Nov
17
comment How to convert math operations from type of str to calculate in Python
stackoverflow.com/questions/2371436/…
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
16
comment XHTML HTML element with 100% height causing scrollbars
The user agent stylesheet in some browsers adds a margin to the body, which usually follows the <html> tag, so this'll happen automatically. Use a reset CSS then.
Jun
6
comment Change Jinja Child Template in response to HTML event
@MattDMo, that sure would work, I was just hoping for a more elegant solution if possible.
Jun
6
asked Change Jinja Child Template in response to HTML event
Apr
22
awarded  Famous Question
Apr
16
awarded  Yearling
Apr
7
comment 2nd order centered finite-difference approximation
No, the approximation is the same order as the leading order error term. For example, [u(i+1)-u(i)]/Δx is a first order approximation for ∂u/∂x as the leading order error term following it is O(Δx). What you might be referring to is that a numerical scheme is one order lower than the order of its local truncation error.
Apr
7
comment 2nd order centered finite-difference approximation
Although the denominator is Δx, it's a centered difference, which is 2nd order.
Apr
7
revised 2nd order centered finite-difference approximation
deleted 37 characters in body
Apr
7
comment 2nd order centered finite-difference approximation
Found the answer in section 2.5 of this: springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/…;. Someone gave it to me, so I don't want to take credit by posting an answer.
Apr
7
comment 2nd order centered finite-difference approximation
I think you've misinterpreted the notation. The two slopes have not been multiplied to get (du/dx)*(du/dy). They have been nested or composed to get the 2nd order partial derivative d2u/dxdy. Also, I think each of the slopes they plug in are 2nd order here, right? (I'm still pretty new to all this.)
Apr
7
revised 2nd order centered finite-difference approximation
improved formatting and language.
Apr
7
asked 2nd order centered finite-difference approximation
Feb
19
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
19
revised strikethrough for text in the drop down list
Works in Chrome too.
Nov
28
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
23
comment Invalid Python Syntax Error
It might simply be an indentation issue. Try to reduce it to the simplest program that reproduces the problem, and re-post with the entire code. I'm sure you'll get helpful answers.
Oct
24
awarded  Necromancer