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seen Sep 13 at 18:04

Mar
30
comment how to check javascript array equals?
Oops, it seems back in the day I was in a rush and tricked myself into misreading someone's comment, and so said an irrelevant falsehood (that JSON.stringify(null)=='"null"'). I still do not see a problem in relation to OP's question with respect to any undefineds or nulls that I have not mentioned in my answer. Therefore I stand by my answer and its demo tests.
Mar
17
comment Replacements for switch statement in Python?
Sadly this is the closest people are going to get. Methods which use .get() (like the current highest answers) will need to eagerly evaluate all possibilities before dispatching, and therefore not only are (not just very but) extremely inefficient and also cannot have side-effects; this answer gets around that issue, but is more verbose. I would just use if/elif/else, and even those take just as long to write as 'case'.
Mar
12
comment How to count the number of certain element in an array?
A.Krueger: oops, definitely! typo... thanks
Jan
16
comment How to get O(nlogn) from T(n) = 2T(n/2) + O(n)
(With thanks to user2076566 who made a technically correct edit to clarify what I was glossing over, but was rejected by three high-rating users.)
Aug
25
comment how to check javascript array equals?
@djechlin: thank you, updated
Aug
13
comment Generate image from DOM elements
@AmitWadhwa: I merely meant finding a scriptable HTML testing/rendering engine with a secure design, and applying good extra security-in-depth practices like restricting the executing user, or (though likely too resources-intensive) running in a virtual machine or another physical machine, etc.
Aug
11
comment Python: Using vars() to assign a string to a variable
setting locals()[...] has undefined behavior stackoverflow.com/questions/8028708/…
Aug
11
comment For Loop Functions in Python
MattDMo: I would respectfully disagree, I personally find that python and 'pythonic' code is very anti-DRY, not on purpose, but because 'pythonic' has a sub-philosophy of "explicit is always better".
Aug
6
comment Data structure supporting Add and Partial-Sum
Andrei I: 2^(levels-1) - 1 < nodes <= 2^levels - 1 (you claim that a tree can only have 2^(2^k+1) nodes). I think you can use any kind of search tree you want, and you can thus select nodes in any way you want. I talked about elements on the leaves merely because I was assuming a kind of binary search tree where they're only on the leaves. You can use a normal binary search tree and adapt it accordingly I think: each node has {array_index, array_value, sum_of_left_branch_and_me}. The question specifically said there would be no insertions, but you could probably use any self-balancing tree.
Jul
20
comment Arguments for Python decorators
@millimoose: Ooh nice, thanks. I might then use it for when performance is not an issue.
Jul
20
comment Arguments for Python decorators
@millimoose: [continued] But perhaps you're right that I should be using it, for no other reason that perhaps forward-compatibility, perhaps replacing it with another from myfuture import wraps that might be swapped out to do something else. Still not sure if I should use it in examples though because that might increase the required brainpower to figure out what things are doing, since it essentially does nothing (it's been a while since I used it, perhaps I'm ignoring *args or **kw convenience?). Thank you for the suggestion though.
Jul
20
comment Arguments for Python decorators
@millimoose: I personally have a love-hate relationship with partial since I've had issues with it in the past. I feel it's kind of klunkey and destroys method signatures, though currying is good. Even though @wraps exists to allegedly preserve the name of the function and docstring, if I wanted that, imho it'd be better to use a 'real' decorator framework that gets everything right. Unnecessary decorators also can create a significant amount of overhead, which I once tried to ignore but failed. Once made a framework that rewrites the function and recompiles it into what it 'should be'.
Jul
19
comment Python (loops) with a list
.index(...) is almost irrelevant imho; that is not to say that is not useful, but I have almost never needed to use it. What it does is it finds the first occurrence of a number, that is, index(980) would find the index of the first time the number 980 appeared in the list.
Jul
19
comment Python (loops) with a list
Minor probably-irrelevant efficiency issue: this keeps on going through the entire list without a break.
Jun
24
comment Python strings split with multiple delimiters
Clever, should work on all English grammatical constructs I can think of except an em-dash with no spaces—this, for example. (Workaroundable.)
Jun
21
comment How efficient is Python's 'in' or 'not in' operators?
I assume you mean if item[x] in randomlist, not ...in randomlist[x]
Jun
20
comment How efficient is Python's 'in' or 'not in' operators?
@LennartRegebro: actually he will want to, since he mentioned he is performing this operation multiple times.
Jun
20
comment Comparing 2 dicts, if values are the same, but key is different, add key to a new list in python
@2rs2ts: I'm not sure that would work by itself, might have to make a few more changes.
Jun
20
comment Comparing 2 dicts, if values are the same, but key is different, add key to a new list in python
Your design will fail in the case of two files with the same name. It is possible for there to be, say, myfolder1/file1 and myfolder2/file1, and you will consider them the same by doing ...[file] = get_hash(...) (overwriting one or the other based on the random order you visited them). I am also confused why you are hashing.
Jun
17
comment How to find a value in a list of python dictionaries?
You may want ('name' in d) and d['name']==query if the 'name' field might not exist. (d.get('name')==query is shorter but would return a false positive if query==None, if for some weird reason the name field could be None)