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visits member for 3 years, 9 months
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I'm a guy who likes to build stuff, especially when it comes to new algorithms. That's a rare treat, of course...


Jan
1
comment Sending websocket ping/pong frame from browser
In RFC 6455, The WebSocket Protocol, it explicitly states: "NOTE: A Ping frame may serve either as a keepalive or as a means to verify that the remote endpoint is still responsive."
Jan
1
comment Sending websocket ping/pong frame from browser
TCP does not notify of disconnects when RST/FIN packets were not received. TCP only detects dropped connections when a sender attempts to send on a disconnected connection. Pings are used as heartbeats in many applications and it's a valid use. A dead connection will simply remain dead forever until the client tries to send. Therefore, with WebSockets on the browser, a custom ping (or heartbeat) message must be used to detect client disconnect on the client side. The server may be trying to ping, and detecting the client disconnect, but the client is not informed. Client pings are also fine.
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
31
comment How to set up tortoisegit to not require password using ssh
SSH is not clear text. Also, requiring a password to open your private key is no easier than just using a password directly.
Jul
18
accepted How to find out if Windows Sockets send buffer is empty?
Jul
18
comment Why is there no logical xor in JavaScript?
My edit was rejected, after which @matts re-edited it exactly the way I fixed it, so I missed my (measely) 2 points. 3 people rejected it and I'm baffled what they used as their criteria. Thx matts.
Jul
15
awarded  Informed
Jul
15
suggested rejected edit on Why is there no logical xor in JavaScript?
Jul
10
comment Is it possible to create a hidden property in javascript
Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj) will still get the name of the hidden property.
Feb
11
awarded  Caucus
Dec
15
comment Subversion stuck due to “previous operation has not finished”?
Running the console command will probably give enough info to actually solve the problem. This is a much better answer.
Nov
25
comment YES or NO: Can a server send an HTTP response, while still uploading the file from the correlative HTTP request?
Likely the scenario is that you can certainly send a response as soon as you know any kind of request was made, even before the headers are received, but the browser will likely just send the entire body before it even tries to read or parse the response. So the entire will will be uploaded, while TCP for the response stalls, and this will continue until the browser starts processing the response after it has sent the entire file. So the JS cannot access the response until the file is sent in its entirety.
Nov
25
comment Is it acceptable for a server to send a HTTP response before the entire request has been received?
Okay, so the RFC states the client SHOULD "cease transmitting the body". But the server can't know where the next request begins, so the client "ceasing transmission" would mean disconnecting, because keep-alive requires knowing the end of the request.
Nov
11
comment JSON left out Infinity and NaN; JSON status in ECMAScript?
@wirrbel, I completely agree that these values should be representable in JSON. As far as code execution issues: If code parsing the JSON has previously messed with NaN, then it's the programmer who decided to change this. This is not a "remote execution vulnerability". At least not any more than: String.prototype.indexOf=function(){throw new Error('Crash!')}; followed at some point by obj=JSON.parse(remoteString);alert((obj.prop||"").indexOf('ok'));. Again, it's the programmer that decided to mess with the String class, and the JSON only refers to it, but doesn't dictate what it does.
Nov
10
awarded  Enthusiast
Nov
5
comment Stop processing request when request times out
If you do not use node 0.11.x, you can still use generators (ES6), but you have to compile it to vanilla JS (ES5), which you can do with traceur.
Nov
5
comment Stop processing request when request times out
If you use node 0.11.x, you can use generator-based functions (gen-run, suspend), and you can modify it to toss exceptions into the generator function whenever you want to abort the function, in combination with ignoring the original next callback. You then have the power for a real 'abort' call on a 'running function' (which is actually suspended of course). This in essence would put a check after each callback invocation and push a 'bail out' all the way to the function exit (unless you catch and ignore errors).
Oct
30
awarded  Tumbleweed
Oct
29
comment Stop processing request when request times out
You can store the rabbit connection on a global object with an id (could be client ip or a cookie value or whatever) and you can retrieve this connection on the next request. ALSO you can store the rabbit connection on the socket itself and listen for 'close', and kill the rabbit connection when that happens. Killing means calling 'close' or setting a flag so in your own code it bails. Going for the first option, you can have multiple socket/http connections converge to a single server 'connection' by some id.
Oct
29
comment Stop processing request when request times out
I don't agree. Not all http requests are served in subsecond times. Some may take hours (downloads) and take significant resources (read large file). Also, these are quite likely to be dropped by clients (tired of waiting). Considering this, it may be advantageous to have an early-out. AFAICT, Sarah is right when she says you need to do this manually. That said, it's not necessary to this at every callback. It's sufficient to break a loop if there is one. If there are no loops or pipes, then it would likely not be worth it to provide an early-out mechanism (as your answer states).