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Oct
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
21
reviewed Approve suggested edit on I am trying to learn OpenGL 3 by OpenGL Programming Guide 7th edition but how much is OpenGL 4.0 different from 3.x?
Oct
21
reviewed Reject suggested edit on XAML bind to static method with parameters
Oct
15
revised How to use an iterator as is in the ECMA6 proposal?
added 14 characters in body
Oct
14
comment How do I parse a simple time string into a time period?
@theTinMan: Yes, obviously you don't want to define a DSL for every input form in your app. In that manner, free text is generally not the right thing to use. But in some cases, it's difficult to have a good UI that is restrictive enough to avoid ambiguities, yet permissive enough to not annoy users (for example, adding ingredients to a recipe app). In such cases, one option is to allow free text, along with some (hopefully) robust parsing, to give the user the flexibility that is needed. This may not be the case for OP, though.
Oct
14
answered How to use an iterator as is in the ECMA6 proposal?
Oct
14
revised Numpy CountVectorizer: AttributeError: 'numpy.ndarray' object has no attribute 'lower'
edited tags
Oct
14
revised How do I parse a simple time string into a time period?
added 152 characters in body
Oct
14
comment How do I parse a simple time string into a time period?
@theTinMan: That's why you don't let them break your app. You add error handling. You need this whether or not you allow free text.
Oct
14
answered How do I parse a simple time string into a time period?
Oct
14
comment How do I parse a simple time string into a time period?
@diego.greyrobot: Unless you want the user to have the flexibility of writing anything they want. (Although I agree that perhaps the Investment class isn't where this conversion should be happening)
Oct
13
revised C# Generics and using the non-generic version from typed method
added 33 characters in body
Oct
13
comment C# Generics and using the non-generic version from typed method
@Madd0g: I edited it to address what you mentioned. It's a little heavy-handed, but it does seem doable using generics. You could also add a where clause to constrain the generics, as well. Whether or not it's better as far as clarity goes, it probably depends on exactly how much code you'd be duplicating otherwise.
Oct
13
revised C# Generics and using the non-generic version from typed method
added 289 characters in body
Oct
13
answered C# Generics and using the non-generic version from typed method
Oct
13
comment C# Generics and using the non-generic version from typed method
@SimonWhitehead: The reason he's passing a Func is so that the application code can return an IRestResponse for his PerformApiCall function. If it was an Action instead, there would be nothing for the // handle errors part to work with.
Oct
13
comment C# Generics and using the non-generic version from typed method
@SimonWhitehead: What about HTTP status codes? Content type? Headers? Error messages?
Oct
13
comment C# Generics and using the non-generic version from typed method
@robobot3000: I think he still needs to use the return value (of non-generic type IRestResponse) to do error handling. If he switches to Action, there will be no way to access the response.
Oct
12
revised How can I read one character from stdin without having to hit enter?
deleted 2 characters in body
Oct
10
comment underscore/lodash unique by multiple properties
@dandavis: I suppose you could do JSON.stringify on the array, instead of using join. Really, though, it would be easier to just rewrite uniq to take into consideration multiple properties.