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seen Apr 23 '13 at 21:17

Oct
12
comment Error loading function from file in GHCi
@dave4420: You can omit the trailing .hs from file names. GHCi is smart enough to try a few variants.
Oct
11
comment Haskell: Function receiving a null list
@Special--k: No, you didn't. Pattern matching and testing for equality are not the same.
Oct
11
comment Haskell: Function receiving a null list
Your second attempt fails because you're trying to match [] to (x:xs). Those don't match --- there's no : in [] --- and so it never gets to your guards. We don't check whether x == [] because [] can never match (x:xs).
Oct
11
answered A Haskell interpreter /w type definitions
Oct
10
revised How do I add x tuples into a list x number of times?
added 45 characters in body
Oct
10
comment How do I add x tuples into a list x number of times?
You don't need a special function to create a tuple---you just type (x, y). (Technicalities omitted for clarity.) If you need a bunch of them, and you're at an interactive prompt, just type them all in a list, as in the edit above.
Oct
10
awarded  Editor
Oct
10
revised How do I add x tuples into a list x number of times?
added 257 characters in body
Oct
10
answered How do I add x tuples into a list x number of times?
Oct
10
comment How do I add x tuples into a list x number of times?
Where are these tuples coming from? Are they in a file? typed in by the user at the command line? or what?
Oct
10
comment How do I add x tuples into a list x number of times?
I think I see more of what you're going for here now. But. The type you link to is not the type of the function you want. It may be the type for the whole problem, but it's not the type of the sub-part you need help with.
Oct
10
comment How do I add x tuples into a list x number of times?
To clarify a little: you're describing a function that takes a tuple (or several, but leave that aside for now) and returns a list of tuples. That would have type (a,b) -> [(a,b)]. But the type in your link describes a function that takes a list of tuples, and returns a list of first elements. Maybe reread the question?
Oct
9
answered How do I pattern match on different types?
Oct
9
comment How do I pattern match on different types?
Do you have a particular use case for this? Or are you just curious? (Not that there's anything wrong curiosity!) To get the behavior you're asking for you have to fight the type system a little bit, so there's probably a more haskell-y way to solve whatever problem you're working on.
Oct
1
comment compare lists in Haskell
input isn't an argument to elem, quite. Read left to right. all takes two arguments, a function and a list, and returns true if the function is true for everything in the list. The arguments to elem are listx and one element at a time from input.
Sep
27
answered Haskell iterate over a list
Sep
26
awarded  Supporter
Sep
26
answered Why is there no built-in Set data type in Haskell?
Jul
23
awarded  Teacher
Jul
22
answered Distributing wxHaskell based application in Windows