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awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
27
comment sqlx postgres scan method fail
Sure, yes. That's related to your database schema. If the type of accounts.location is of postgres type point, then yes, what you're doing sounds reasonable. Without the schema in hand, all I could say was that Value and Scan needed to match. If the underlying type in the database were a binary data type, like bytea, that'd be a factor.
Apr
26
revised sqlx postgres scan method fail
added 27 characters in body
Apr
26
revised sqlx postgres scan method fail
deleted 122 characters in body
Apr
26
comment sqlx postgres scan method fail
Uh... please add test cases. If all you've done is add some arbitrary casts from bytes to strings, you've made a huge conceptual mistake.
Apr
26
answered sqlx postgres scan method fail
Apr
26
comment sqlx postgres scan method fail
How are you writing your geopoints to the database? Are you using binary.Write? Hard to tell what's going on without this. The code of GeoPoint.Value() suggests that you're using some kind of arbitrary human-friendly string representation. If that's the case, then binary.Read won't be an appropriate way to deserialize that representation.
Apr
26
comment How do you Unmarshall into the correct order in Go?
That is, this is encouraging the mistaken assumption that the original questioner had over the behavior of reflect.DeepEqual. The questioner is attributing the inequality to the observation that the two values are printing differently. In actuality, it is the difference in numeric type that's significant. reflect.DeepEqual doesn't care how a value gets printed.
Apr
26
comment How do you Unmarshall into the correct order in Go?
Have to disagree strongly with this answer. Iterator order does not explain the difference: reflect.DeepEqual is perfectly capable of comparing maps. The implementation starting in golang.org/src/reflect/deepequal.go#L101 to around line 116 shows that the map comparison isn't affected by iteration order. lossleader's answer is correct.
Apr
25
revised App Engine Datastore: How to set multiple values on a property using golang?
edited body
Apr
25
answered App Engine Datastore: How to set multiple values on a property using golang?
Apr
25
awarded  Yearling
Mar
29
revised Why is the value of my database column always 0?
added 54 characters in body
Mar
29
revised Why is the value of my database column always 0?
added 470 characters in body
Mar
29
answered Why is the value of my database column always 0?
Mar
23
answered In go (golang), how can you cast an interface pointer into a struct pointer?
Mar
15
comment What is the cause of this panic?
See: blog.golang.org/go-maps-in-action for an introduction to maps in Go.
Mar
13
comment golang sort.Sort random output and is wrong
Another way to see why it's broken: consider the two statements Stmt{"first", []string{}} and Stmt{"second", []string{}}. A proper comparator should say that either first is less than second, or vice-versa, but, crucially, not both, not unless you want the system to treat them indistinguishably. The comparator you've defined will say otherwise, so the sort can't give the results you want.
Mar
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
21
comment Why does golang prohibit assignment to same underlying type when one is a native type?
Also consider the design of parts of the library like time.Duration. The language prevents plain int64s from being treated as time.Duration without the expliclt units consideration. The feature that you're critiquing can (and is!) used to encode the "same units" rule we know from middle school. When used well, it should make it more difficult to make the same kinds of mistakes that sends satellites crashing out of the sky due to a metric conversion error.