3,103 reputation
720
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Jan 22 at 7:15

Oct
24
comment How do I source my .zshrc within emacs?
FWIW, since I wrote this answer there is now a package in MELPA which solves this problem, named exec-path-from-shell. It would probably be best to install that package rather than copying and pasting this snippet. As well as being properly maintained, it also allows copying other environment variables from your normal shell setup, so any subprocesses started from Emacs will work as expected.
Oct
17
comment Emacs, using replace-regexp-in-string to match two regexps
I agree it doesn't seem like the ideal behavior. You could report it as a bug if you like ( M-x report-emacs-bug).
Oct
17
comment Emacs, using replace-regexp-in-string to match two regexps
Based on the code comments, the implementation seems to be designed for efficiency -- in particular, to avoid copying the entire string with each replacement, as the simpler implementation would do.
Oct
3
comment Emacs - I cannot save buffer into file because of backup
Starting Emacs from the command line as emacs -Q is useful if you need to make an emergency edit to a broken init file like this. The -Q bypasses most customization files.
Sep
25
comment How to access “two” in ((“one” . “two”)) in elisp
Huh, I never knew of this function. Useful.
Sep
24
comment How to access “two” in ((“one” . “two”)) in elisp
For pulling apart more complex list structures, I find the cl-destructuring-bind and pcase macros to be very useful. (The latter is only in Emacs 24). Both let you extract parts of a list by writing down a kind of template of its structure, so the shape of the code resembles the shape of the data you are looking for.
Sep
24
comment How to access “two” in ((“one” . “two”)) in elisp
Confusingly, the Emacs Lisp syntax which begins #(" in one of your snippets actually doesn't represent a list, but a string with text properties. See the Info node "Text Props and Strings" in the Emacs Lisp manual for details on how it works.
Sep
7
comment How to hook emacs up to a json service?
Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/15118304/…. The answer there mentions the request library, which I have not used.
Aug
9
comment Is there any benefit to using an obarray rather than a hash-table in Emacs Lisp?
Thank you for the detailed answer. I was interested to learn that the memory usage is about the same, which I had not expected.
Aug
8
comment Is there any benefit to using an obarray rather than a hash-table in Emacs Lisp?
I suspect that an obarray may be less space-efficient than a hash-table for representing a set, since the hash-table wastes a single value slot per key, while the obarray wastes at least three, since each symbol has a value, function and plist slot.
Aug
8
comment Is there any benefit to using an obarray rather than a hash-table in Emacs Lisp?
That's not quite right -- you can use symbol-value and set as with normal symbols: (let* ((o (make-vector 11 0)) (s (intern "s" o))) (set s 'value) (symbol-value s))value. But in this case interning and uninterning would be sufficient anyway.
Aug
7
comment How do you write an emacs lisp function to replace a word at point?
Also, in your first version of the function, you should probably bind local variables using (let* ((bds …) (p1 …) (p2 …)) … instead of setq (which will operate on the global variable by that name when there is no surrounding let binding).
Aug
7
comment How do you write an emacs lisp function to replace a word at point?
I don't think delete-region moves point, while insert inserts its arguments at point. Could that be part of the problem?
Aug
4
comment Emacs d-mode cannot handle backquoted backslashes
If syntax tables are insufficient, it may be worth looking into syntax-propertize-rules and the syntax-propertize-function variable, which provide more flexibility by using regular expressions to describe syntax. Unfortunately they only exist in Emacs 24 and up, IIRC.
Aug
4
comment Is a macro that puts the contents of a form into a string possible?
What you really want for this sort of thing is a Common Lisp-style reader macro, which works directly on the program text as a character stream (rather than an already-read sequence of Lisp objects). However, Emacs Lisp doesn't have reader macros. You are probably best off using strings.
Jun
13
comment Run some lines in emacs (amateur thing)
You could also just paste these into the *scratch* buffer and evaluate them by typing C-x C-e or M-x eval-buffer. (The former key-sequence evaluates just one balanced "form" before the cursor, the latter evaluates everything in the current buffer.)
May
31
comment How to process file paths in Emacs?
I'm not sure I understand the question, but have you looked at the file-relative-name function? (file-relative-name "/foo/bar/baz/quux" "/foo/bar") ==> "baz/quux"
May
30
comment Is there an existing lisp macro for building up a list?
Just a thought, I often find that text processing similar to that example -- iterating through chunks of text by searching for delimiters -- is easier to do with a temporary buffer than a string in Emacs Lisp. YMMV, and not really relevant to the main question.
May
30
comment Is there an existing lisp macro for building up a list?
After further experimentation, I think the inner macro definition should have (push ,exp ,',results), but I have only a vague idea of why this works.
May
30
comment Is there an existing lisp macro for building up a list?
I get Symbol's value as variable is void: results when using this definition. I think something is not quite right with the nested backquoting of the results gensym, but I can't figure out the correct sequences of quotes and unquotes to splice it in correctly.