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Jan
10
comment LP Simplex algorithm in C++
The latter is not the simplex algorithm to solve linear programming problems, but the algorithm for nonlinear optimization by Nelder and Mead
Jan
10
answered How to include lpsolve, a c-based linear programming library in my ios app
Dec
3
awarded  Organizer
Dec
3
revised Step into boost .ipp files using xcode 4.4.1 debugger
added tags
Dec
3
suggested suggested edit on Step into boost .ipp files using xcode 4.4.1 debugger
Dec
3
answered Step into boost .ipp files using xcode 4.4.1 debugger
Nov
13
comment capture member variable by value
Yes, I know about copy elision, but its criteria are not met in this case, since the sources of both copies are not temporaries: 1) my_member is not a temporary when constructing my_member_copy 2) my_member_copy is not a temporary when constructing the lambda.
Nov
13
comment capture member variable by value
@ronag: Are you sure? shared_ptr is not so simple, its copy constructor has the side-effect of incrementing a counter in a thread-safe manner, which is implemented on most (all?) platforms with atomics. I wouldn't bet that can be optimized away.
Nov
12
comment capture member variable by value
@ronag: rkjnsn is right, his example saves the increment/decrement/pointer-copy when constructing my_member_copy and should be thus faster. Why would you downvote his answer?
Nov
8
accepted Copy elision in chained invocation of constructors
Nov
8
asked Copy elision in chained invocation of constructors
Nov
7
answered “enum class” emulation or solid alternative for MSVC 10.0
Oct
17
comment Sane design for a class holding a shared resource
But what should subarray c = x(10,20); c = y(30,40); do? 1) Re-reference to y or 2) overwrite a part of x? When 1), you have to keep in mind if c is an array or a subarray. When 2), copy-initialization and copy-assignment behave differently. That's the inconsistency that I mean.
Oct
17
comment Sane design for a class holding a shared resource
@R.MartinhoFernandes: Sure. That's why I wrote that in this case, the whole discussion applies to subarrays: y(10,20) = x(10,20); copies, subarray y = x(10,20); creates a new reference. Still inconsistent.
Oct
17
comment Sane design for a class holding a shared resource
Yes, I thought about that. But I'd like the subarray to live on when the original array goes out of scope. So the whole discussion applies to subarrays then, just replace all occurrences of array above with subarray. Or am I overseeing something?
Oct
17
comment Sane design for a class holding a shared resource
Generally, yes. But it depends. See this answer. In any case, I'd like to implement the copy constructor and copy assignment operator in a way that they behave consistently, according the principle of least surprise.
Oct
17
comment Sane design for a class holding a shared resource
Right, bad example. The assignment array z = x; is not eligible for copy elision, since z is not a temporary. I have updated the question accordingly.
Oct
17
revised Sane design for a class holding a shared resource
updated copy elision example
Oct
17
asked Sane design for a class holding a shared resource
Oct
11
comment operators in C++ class
@JohnDibling: I was about to write something similar but thought it'd be bold to say that self assignment is generally never encountered in sane code. I can't think of any situation where self-assignment might occur, but does it really never happen? Maybe in some sorting algorithm, but so rarely that it's not worth checking for?