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  • 20 votes cast
Mar
2
comment how does big companies like google, amazon, manage their private key infrastructure?
Though if "one of my company's employees private key" means they have private keys per employee, for example for TLS client certificates or signed email, then an HSM is a bad model, and they are probably better off with smart cards. (You can use thousands of keys on a Thales HSM, and have access to them individually controlled by smart cards, or passwords, or both.) For things like webserver certificates, or code-signing keys, the HSM will be more appropriate. HSMs can also be used as part of a smart card provisioning architecture.
Feb
24
comment Is using underscore suffix for members beneficial?
It works for more complex setters that are buying something over raw access too. void someMember( int newValue ) { validate(newValue); someMember_ = newValue; }
Jan
19
comment Is there a good block cipher that supports small block sizes?
Triple DES has the same block size, is equally approved, and is far more widely implemented. Skipjack is faster though.
Aug
22
comment Using friend in templates
Yes, "friend T;" is in C++11: isocpp.org/blog/2013/05/…
Jul
18
answered Combining multiple gprof result files into a single file
Jun
13
comment Lock-free swap of two unique_ptr<T>
There's a proposal to add atomic<unique_ptr> (and atomic<shared_ptr> ) at isocpp.org/blog/2014/06/n4058 Doesn't help you right now, but the commentary might be useful. (And I think confirms that going through a raw T* pointer that does work with atomic<> is the best you can do at the moment).
May
6
answered Exporting GSSCredential to byte array and vice versa
Apr
23
comment Kerberos/negotiate S4U2proxy authenticate on behalf of user
For Apache - modauthkerb.sourceforge.net
Apr
23
comment Kerberos/negotiate S4U2proxy authenticate on behalf of user
Both MIT and Heimdal do support constrained delegation. MIT supports it through GSS-API as well as the lower level Kerberos layer. However, Heimdal's KDC supports it directly and MIT's needs you to set it up using LDAP manually.
Mar
20
answered Install GNU c/c++ in solaris 11 with Solaris Studio
Mar
13
awarded  Commentator
Mar
13
comment Is there a C++11 to C++03 converter?
The Comeau C++ compiler apparently still compiles to C. It only has partial support for C++11 though.
Mar
5
comment Why should I use a pointer rather than the object itself?
Smart pointers existed before C++11, e.g. boost::shared_ptr and boost::scoped_ptr. Other projects have their own equivalent. You can't get move semantics, and std::auto_ptr's assign is flawed, so C++11 improves things, but the advice is still good. (And a sad nitpick, it's not enough to have access to a C++11 compiler, it's necessary that all the compilers you might possibly want your code to work with support C++11. Yes, Oracle Solaris Studio, I'm looking at you.)
Feb
21
awarded  Teacher
Feb
21
comment How to wrap Microsoft RSA key blob in HSM
You could generate the key as non-sensitive, wrap on the host, then use C_SetAttributeValues to make it sensitive. Ideally you would create it as a session key and only make it a token key once it was sensitive, but nCipher's PKCS#11 implementation probably still doesn't allow that. Having the "friendly consultants, cough" help you use CodeSafe to move the custom wrapping inside the HSM would be more secure though.
Jan
24
comment Alternatives to dlsym() and dlopen() in C++
For example, PKCS#11 defines C_GetFunctionList for this purpose. Here's an example of its use: stackoverflow.com/a/16132459/729705 (It's common practice to load PKCS#11 libraries with dlopen, because the application writer won't know which cryptographic tokens the user wants to use. They might even use several different PKCS#11 libraries at once - they each have a C_GetFunctionList function, and the dlopen handle passed to dlsym says which library you want the function for.)
Jan
2
comment ssl impact on web server
I hadn't noticed just how old the answer was, it came up in a search for something else. But 4.5 years ago you could get away with 1024-bit RSA though. (Nine years ago you could buy a card doing 10,000 connections per second, not just 1000. Not a typical hosting box though. businesswire.com/news/home/20050801005542/en/…)
Nov
19
comment ssl impact on web server
A few thousand on a single box is certainly possible, though it'll be an expensive multi-processor/multi-core box, especially with 2048-bit keys. e.g. riverbed.com/assets/media/documents/briefs/… "Stronger 2048-bit keys are advisable, which are approximately five times more computationally expensive. Budget for approximately 600 new handshakes per second per core, or in excess of 7,000 new SSL handshakes on a 12-core server."
Oct
8
comment Kerberos constrained delegation with protocol transition in java on linux
Not exactly a duplicate, but related: stackoverflow.com/questions/10099321/…
Oct
8
answered how to implement Kerberos protocol transition in Java? (S4U2Self)