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seen Jun 27 '10 at 21:00
Developer/researcher, mostly C++. Graphics, algorithms, numerical analysis, GPU, and new research, mostly. A little of everything. Windows/OSX/Linux, always keep things portable! I am still leery of C# though.. it still feels like the Dark Side.

Mar
7
comment Algorithm to select a single, random combination of values?
This assumes you have an input list that you can modify in place by swapping. This is often true, but just as often is not possible.
Mar
7
comment Algorithm to select a single, random combination of values?
This is really inefficient if Y is large. Imagine trying to select 100 unique integers from 2^32 values.. this algorithm would be terrible. When x is of the same magnitude as y, it's the right method, though. (The method for x<<y is likely random sampling and just checking for duplicates. Though if you must stream items in order, you can use Poisson statistics to advance in larger steps than 1 at a time.)
Jan
13
comment What is the fastest way to count the unique elements in a list of billion elements?
This is indeed easiest to code, but the OP asked for fastest. A customised algorithm like a DAWG (see Lee's answer) will beat any database for the OP's specific needs in both space and performance.
Aug
25
comment What are your favorite debugging techniques in C++?
As a question with no definitive answer, this should be a community wiki.
Jul
26
comment C++ derive from a native type
Yeah, I have typedefs already so it's even easier. My main question is efficiently building a MyDebugIntegerClass without having to manually wrap 50+ native int operators. (Or just find someone who has already done it.)
Jul
26
comment C++ derive from a native type
This feels very very promising.. it has the appeal that everything works by default, and the only funcs I need to wrap are the ones I want to deal with custom logging. It almost works! i=i+1; is OK. cout << i; is OK. But for example i+=1; or i++; does not. Still, this may work well for filling in most of the operators and I can manually deal with the remainder.
Jul
26
comment C++ derive from a native type
@Evan.. thanks, that's a nice resource in general! Overkill for what I need but if I do need to roll my own it'd cut the redundant work significantly.
Jul
23
comment function passed as template argument
@Charles, so actually such a template is really passing a function POINTER? But that's really bizarre.. you can't make a template that takes a constant class instance pointer, for example. And if it's a pointer, than it's opaque to the compiler and it could never inline.
Jul
23
comment function passed as template argument
Could a template overload be used to make the function pointer and the functor cases have identical syntax? Would there be any performance benefit? Especially for stateless functors which effectively have no instances and therefore we want to avoid any case where the compiler may stop inlining and optimization.
Jul
23
comment function passed as template argument
Now here's an interesting question. When passed a function name, it's NOT like there's a function pointer involved. It's an explicit function, given at compile time. So the compiler knows exactly what it's got at compile time.
Jul
19
comment Best continuously sorting algorithm?
red black trees retrieve in O(N log N) not O(n). The advantage of red black trees is cheaper deletions... but that's not a cost the original question worried about.
Jul
16
comment C++ Template preprocessor tool
Yes! This is the tool I used 15 years ago for the same reason! Excellent, thanks.
Jul
16
comment C++ Template preprocessor tool
Yes.. such a tool would indeed need to parse the C++. That's why it's more complicated than a macro preprocessor.
Jul
14
comment Given an array of numbers, except for one number all the others, occur twice. Give an algorithm to find that number which occurs only once in the array
Sorting is O(N). COMPARISON sort is O(n log n), but there's no need to use a compare sort for this. These aer numbers so you can use an O(N) inplace sort like a radix sort.
Jul
11
comment Efficient comparison of 100.000 vectors
lerax, are you going to accept an answer?
Jun
30
comment Detecting when an object is passed to a new thread in C++?
@JG wow, that's understandable but becomes even trickier when you need to count even UNUSED references. Indeera's idea of a factory may work better. A reference-counting like pointer strategy might be possible, though, just as a germ of an idea.
Jun
28
comment How do I utilise all the cores for nmake?
Excellent find!!
Jun
26
comment Efficient comparison of 100.000 vectors
@Andreas: thanks. Too bad Lerax didn't like it. :-)
Jun
22
comment Compare three-dimensional structures
@auto, yes, indeed, if the distances lists are not identical, you may have very different point sets. But the question that is being asked is a way to determine identical sets. The "similar objects have similar hashes" is just a nice bonus heuristic but clearly not a guarantee. BTW, nice reference, I used that paper years ago!
Jun
21
comment Compare three-dimensional structures
This solves the wrong problem. It starts with a known matching of each vertex to the other object's corresponding vertex. It then finds the transformations between the objects. In the submitters case, you don't have any knowledge of the pairwise matching vertices to start with... if you did, the problem becomes easy.