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visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Jun 17 at 21:14

May
21
awarded  Guru
May
9
awarded  Yearling
Mar
19
answered Why has “map (filter fst)” the type “[[(Bool, a)]] -> [[(Bool, a)]]”?
Mar
14
answered How to zip lists with different length?
Jan
30
comment Strange behaviour of GHCI after importing Gnuplot
Just noticed this plotting package on Hackage that sounds interesting and relevant. I haven't tried it, though. hackage.haskell.org/package/plot
Jan
2
comment Strange behaviour of GHCI after importing Gnuplot
Unfortunately I didn't find any other solution at the time, mostly because I didn't have the time too look around too much. I hear about Chart and Diagrams now and then, though, so you might find something you like there. Apparently someone is working on something of a port of ggplot2, a plotting package for R that is good, but for that we will have to wait. (Blog post with some examples using Chart.)
Jan
1
answered Strange behaviour of GHCI after importing Gnuplot
Dec
12
comment Haskell slow to compute Ackermann 4 1?
Is this bug really fixed in the latest Haskell platform? I have GHC 7.6.3 here (OS X 10.9, 2.5GHz i5) and ack (with Ints and -fllvm) uses a large amount of memory (gigs) and takes 40 seconds to run. Increasing the stack chunk size (compile with "-O2 -fllvm -rtsopts" and run "time ./Ackermann +RTS -kc1M"), as suggested in the old Stack Overflow post, results in a total time of 4.8 seconds. Could someone with GHC 7.8 try this?
May
9
awarded  Yearling
Apr
22
comment Most efficient way to weight and sum a number of matrices in Fortran
It seems like compilers (and perhaps processors/memory speed?) play a large role here. For me, v2 comes out at ~0.2 seconds, v3 at ~0.3 seconds and v4 at ~0.9 seconds, vs ~0.12 seconds for the manually unrolled one. Seems like I need to get my hands on ifort. :)
Apr
21
comment Most efficient way to weight and sum a number of matrices in Fortran
Yes, I have considered that option. But I'm still not sure if this algorithm will work and don't feel like paying yet, for that reason. For now, gfortran will have to do, while I'm testing things out.
Apr
21
comment Most efficient way to weight and sum a number of matrices in Fortran
Okay, good to know. I guess you use Intel's compiler? If the program ends up working as intended, it will probably worth it investing in a better compiler.
Apr
21
comment Most efficient way to weight and sum a number of matrices in Fortran
Yes, unfortunately it is the critical part of the program. It is part of an objective function for a very difficult minimization problem. I just ran a test in Matlab where the solution was found in ~24 hours. From profiling, it seems like about 95% of the time will be spent doing this weighting. Getting it to 0.1 seconds vs 0.2 should result in a runtime of 3 hours, vs 6 hours. I have other drastic optimizations in mind as well (including optimizing the fitting algorithm, and maybe I can decrease the matrix size, at the cost of precision), but this is an important part.
Apr
21
comment Most efficient way to weight and sum a number of matrices in Fortran
Unfortunately -funroll-loops (with -O2 or -O3) does not affect performance. Anyway, I much appreciate your suggestions.
Apr
21
comment Most efficient way to weight and sum a number of matrices in Fortran
Oh, I forgot to add that I unfortunately don't have access to Intel's MKL, but used the BLAS provided by ATLAS in the MacPorts repository.
Apr
21
comment Most efficient way to weight and sum a number of matrices in Fortran
And yes, I will use some parallelization eventually, but I thought it would be better to run a batch (>=2) of these functions in parallel instead of trying to incorporate parallelization inside each "instance" of the function. Matlab's support for multithreading is quite poor, but supposedly bsxfun applies the supplied function in parallel if the data set is large enough.
Apr
21
awarded  Commentator
Apr
21
comment Most efficient way to weight and sum a number of matrices in Fortran
I tried both your alternatives but they end up running at ~0.2 seconds, so half as fast as the manually unrolled version. I wonder if I have missed something when compiling. Is there a way to turn off runtime bounds checking in gfortran? Running with and without -fcheck=bounds makes no difference in performance. @KyleKanos: Isn't that exactly what steabert did?
Apr
21
comment Most efficient way to weight and sum a number of matrices in Fortran
Sure, I tried it, and it runs in about 0.5 seconds. I think I will try a workaround where I create a number of functions with different number of weights, and then use a vector of pointers to these functions to choose from by index. I hope the compiler will be smart enough to optimize away the extra indirection.
Apr
20
comment Most efficient way to weight and sum a number of matrices in Fortran
Thanks for the suggestion! I need to learn this kind of notation, with a loop inside the expression. It is quite a bit faster than my loop, at 0.22 seconds, but unfortunately not as fast as the unwrapped code, at 0.12 seconds. So, a factor of two difference still.