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I’m the enemy in the end.


9h
revised change lowercase file names to uppercase with awk ,sed or bash
added 524 characters in body
9h
revised change lowercase file names to uppercase with awk ,sed or bash
added 275 characters in body
9h
revised change lowercase file names to uppercase with awk ,sed or bash
added 81 characters in body
9h
revised change lowercase file names to uppercase with awk ,sed or bash
added 568 characters in body
Oct
14
comment sed edit the file in place
@amphibient: Would you mind at all prefixing your question's title with the word 'Solaris'? The value of your question is being lost. Please see the comments below my answer. Thanks.
Oct
14
comment sed edit the file in place
@a_arias: You're right; he did. But he can't achieve what he wants using Solaris sed. The question was actually a very good one, but it's value has been diminished by people who either can't read man pages or can't be bothered to actually read questions here on SO.
Oct
9
comment bash- remove \n every three lines
@confused00: If your input string contains a format specifier you will have problems; i.e. printf() will assume it has more arguments than it should.
Oct
9
comment bash- remove \n every three lines
Instead of $0" ", it's safer to use: "%s ", $0.
Oct
9
answered bash- remove \n every three lines
Oct
7
comment ssh does not reliably return output from remote command
@GregRogers: I couldn't reproduce the problem on a node with what I would consider a heavy load; not 15% of the time; not even once (n=1000). How heavy is 'heavy'? Could your machines be under network or disk wait? Also, can you reproduce the error using an SSH-key instead of an SSH-password?
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
1
revised Extracting IP address from a line from ifconfig output with grep
deleted 21 characters in body
Aug
27
comment awk - remove character in regex
@linux_newbie: WRT#4: Only you know what your actual input is and only you know what the expected output ought to be. From what I can tell, your actual input is a table of strangely formatted numbers, some of which look like phone numbers. There may be extra rows or columns in there, but I really don't know for sure. You've asked a question, but it wasn't the question you really wanted to ask. If you are still having difficulty, please edit your question with some actual input and expected output. Include as many edge cases as possible. HTH.
Aug
27
comment awk - remove character in regex
@linux_newbie: WRT#3: Remember, if you're really stuck with substitutions, you can often use multiple calls gsub(). Yes, it's less efficient but it will get the job done and save some frustration. I believe the problem you're having with the regex is because you're trying to escape some characters. A better way to write that character class would be: gsub(/[][() /|\+-]*/, "").
Aug
27
comment awk - remove character in regex
@linux_newbie: WRT#1: I was under the impression that you wanted to strip these characters from each line. Doing so makes it easy to then test to see if the number starts with 1 and is followed by ten digits. WRT#2: If no changes are made to a line, AWK will print the line without setting the new OFS. This is a good thing, because it makes AWK run fast. If you want AWK to force a change to the line's field separator, the AWKish way is to say let $1=$1. Try: awk -F, -v OFS='|' '{ gsub(/[() +-]*/, ""); for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) { if ($i ~ /^1[0-9]{10}$/) { sub(/^1/, "", $i) } } $1=$1 }1' file
Aug
27
comment awk - remove character in regex
@linux_newbie: The for loop used is your typical C-style loop, which in this case will loop from one to the number of fields in the row, NF. $i is therefore the actual field value, and i is its field position. Another common type of loop you will see regularly in AWK code is one that loops over the indices of an array. For example, for (i in a) { print i, a[i] } will print the key (i) followed by the key's value (a[i]). HTH.
Aug
27
comment awk - remove character in regex
@linux_newbie: No worries. The 1 on the end forces the command to return true. By default, AWK will print the record (which, by default, is a single line) when the expression evaluates to true. Of course, you don't necessarily need to use 1 (you could use any non-zero integer), but the use of 1 to return true is best practice. The long equivalent would be: awk 'BEGIN { FS="," } { gsub(/[() +-]*/, ""); for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) { if ($i ~ /^1[0-9]{10}$/) { sub(/^1/, "", $i) } } print }' file. The placement of the braces is critical.
Aug
26
comment awk - remove character in regex
@linux_newbie: Is there any reason why you cannot throw a gsub(/[ () +-]*/, "") in front of the loop? That would be the simplest solution IMO. If you want to apply that to a subset of fields, just move it inside the loop and set a target. For example: awk -F, '{ for(i=1;i<=NF;i++) { gsub(/[ () +-]*/, "", $i); if ($i ~ /^1[0-9]{10}$/) { sub(/^1/, "", $i) } } }1' OFS=, file
Aug
26
comment uppercase first character in a variable with bash
@Dean: FWIW, I've never wanted to run OSX :-)