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I’m the enemy in the end.


Sep
1
revised Extracting IP address from a line from ifconfig output with grep
deleted 21 characters in body
Aug
27
comment awk - remove character in regex
@linux_newbie: WRT#4: Only you know what your actual input is and only you know what the expected output ought to be. From what I can tell, your actual input is a table of strangely formatted numbers, some of which look like phone numbers. There may be extra rows or columns in there, but I really don't know for sure. You've asked a question, but it wasn't the question you really wanted to ask. If you are still having difficulty, please edit your question with some actual input and expected output. Include as many edge cases as possible. HTH.
Aug
27
comment awk - remove character in regex
@linux_newbie: WRT#3: Remember, if you're really stuck with substitutions, you can often use multiple calls gsub(). Yes, it's less efficient but it will get the job done and save some frustration. I believe the problem you're having with the regex is because you're trying to escape some characters. A better way to write that character class would be: gsub(/[][() /|\+-]*/, "").
Aug
27
comment awk - remove character in regex
@linux_newbie: WRT#1: I was under the impression that you wanted to strip these characters from each line. Doing so makes it easy to then test to see if the number starts with 1 and is followed by ten digits. WRT#2: If no changes are made to a line, AWK will print the line without setting the new OFS. This is a good thing, because it makes AWK run fast. If you want AWK to force a change to the line's field separator, the AWKish way is to say let $1=$1. Try: awk -F, -v OFS='|' '{ gsub(/[() +-]*/, ""); for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) { if ($i ~ /^1[0-9]{10}$/) { sub(/^1/, "", $i) } } $1=$1 }1' file
Aug
27
comment awk - remove character in regex
@linux_newbie: The for loop used is your typical C-style loop, which in this case will loop from one to the number of fields in the row, NF. $i is therefore the actual field value, and i is its field position. Another common type of loop you will see regularly in AWK code is one that loops over the indices of an array. For example, for (i in a) { print i, a[i] } will print the key (i) followed by the key's value (a[i]). HTH.
Aug
27
comment awk - remove character in regex
@linux_newbie: No worries. The 1 on the end forces the command to return true. By default, AWK will print the record (which, by default, is a single line) when the expression evaluates to true. Of course, you don't necessarily need to use 1 (you could use any non-zero integer), but the use of 1 to return true is best practice. The long equivalent would be: awk 'BEGIN { FS="," } { gsub(/[() +-]*/, ""); for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) { if ($i ~ /^1[0-9]{10}$/) { sub(/^1/, "", $i) } } print }' file. The placement of the braces is critical.
Aug
26
comment awk - remove character in regex
@linux_newbie: Is there any reason why you cannot throw a gsub(/[ () +-]*/, "") in front of the loop? That would be the simplest solution IMO. If you want to apply that to a subset of fields, just move it inside the loop and set a target. For example: awk -F, '{ for(i=1;i<=NF;i++) { gsub(/[ () +-]*/, "", $i); if ($i ~ /^1[0-9]{10}$/) { sub(/^1/, "", $i) } } }1' OFS=, file
Aug
26
comment uppercase first character in a variable with bash
@Dean: FWIW, I've never wanted to run OSX :-)
Aug
26
comment uppercase first character in a variable with bash
@vwvan: Yes, sorry, you will need GNU sed in this instance
Aug
26
revised awk - remove character in regex
added 221 characters in body
Aug
26
answered awk - remove character in regex
Aug
19
comment Extracting IP address from a line from ifconfig output with grep
@MichaelTomkins: AFAIK, ifconfig will never produce an invalid address. If you are trying to grep from a text file containing pseudo-IP addresses, you would usually want to validate them anyway, by checking that they exist on your network. If you just want to select only technically valid addresses, then I've added some code to do that. Please see above.
Aug
19
revised Extracting IP address from a line from ifconfig output with grep
added 131 characters in body
Aug
19
revised Extracting IP address from a line from ifconfig output with grep
deleted 75 characters in body
Aug
19
revised Extracting IP address from a line from ifconfig output with grep
added 425 characters in body
Aug
14
comment how do I use the grep --include option for multiple file types?
@JamesMoore: Take a look at GNU Parallel. It can often be used as a substitute for xargs. This is also worth a quick read. HTH.
Aug
12
answered How to delete everything outside of {} braces in BASH?
Aug
12
answered basename and find return in unix
Aug
1
comment sed edit the file in place
@PetrPeller: Really? If you read the question carefully, you would understand that the OP is trying to avoid something like, sed 's/foo/bar/g' file.txt > file.tmp && mv file.tmp file.txt. Just because in-place editing does the rename using a temporary file, doesn't mean that he/she must perform a manual rename when the option is not available. There are other tools out there that can do what he/she wants, and Perl is the obvious choice. How is this not an answer to the original question?
Jul
29
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