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Scorn and anger we deserve.


Aug
26
comment uppercase first character in a variable with bash
@Dean: FWIW, I've never wanted to run OSX :-)
Aug
26
comment uppercase first character in a variable with bash
@vwvan: Yes, sorry, you will need GNU sed in this instance
Aug
19
comment Extracting IP address from a line from ifconfig output with grep
@MichaelTomkins: AFAIK, ifconfig will never produce an invalid address. If you are trying to grep from a text file containing pseudo-IP addresses, you would usually want to validate them anyway, by checking that they exist on your network. If you just want to select only technically valid addresses, then I've added some code to do that. Please see above.
Aug
14
comment how do I use the grep --include option for multiple file types?
@JamesMoore: Take a look at GNU Parallel. It can often be used as a substitute for xargs. This is also worth a quick read. HTH.
Aug
1
comment sed edit the file in place
@PetrPeller: Really? If you read the question carefully, you would understand that the OP is trying to avoid something like, sed 's/foo/bar/g' file.txt > file.tmp && mv file.tmp file.txt. Just because in-place editing does the rename using a temporary file, doesn't mean that he/she must perform a manual rename when the option is not available. There are other tools out there that can do what he/she wants, and Perl is the obvious choice. How is this not an answer to the original question?
Jul
3
comment awk: only print lines when all words are matched by some words in an array
@Jidder: \W will match any non-word character (alphanumeric or underscore). Regex. Thinking more about it, the OP may also want to add another substitution to handle special cases like hyphenated words, but hasn't explained how to treat them, if they exist.
Jun
20
comment awk using an index key over a range
@jeffpkamp: Awesome. Glad we got there in the end :-)
Jun
19
comment awk using an index key over a range
@jeffpkamp: I have added a reply to your questions above. HTH.
Jun
18
comment counting the number of residues in a file
Best to avoid < file. You will loose access to some built-ins like FILENAME for example.
Jun
16
comment awk using an index key over a range
No. The AWK script above loops through INFILE just once. Time is spent looping through and testing the array values. With eight variables, using an array to hold and test the values in LISTFILE is faster than having to read and process INFILE eight times consecutively. Please see my test results posted below. Would you happen to have some example data that I would be able to benchmark?
Jun
14
comment awk using an index key over a range
I don't believe that that time comparison is a fair one. It looks like you're comparing your first script, which searches for a SINGLE variable, to a script that takes MULTIPLE variables. A better comparison would involve running your first script over and over again for each variable in LISTFILE then summing the walltimes. I can guarantee you that the code posted in this answer will be faster because you will read INFILE just once. If you want speed, process INFILE in parallel. I have added another answer below.
May
2
comment compare two files, print header if
This will be slow for big files because you are reading file2 first. It would be best to read file1 first and process file2 when you need to.
Apr
27
comment Read specific part of a filehandle in PERL
There's no need for a counter; you can simply write a test for one of Perl's special vars, $.
Apr
27
comment Choosing some specific fields from a record with awk
@EdMorton: Perl's string concatenation is slow too. But the join() function works differently. I found this. You will need to search for 'join' (sorry). Here.
Apr
27
comment replace a line containing sub-string prefixing with the string
@BalamuruganA: If this answer has worked for you and you are happy with it, please accept it by clicking the tick to the left. Thanks.
Apr
27
comment Choosing some specific fields from a record with awk
@devnull: Thanks! A good suggestion, but perhaps using $" would be more fitting here. For example: perl -lane '@F = grep { $_ < 4 } @F; print "@F"'. With double quotes, we get the interpolation and since the array separator defaults to a single space, we get exactly what the OP wants.
Apr
27
comment Choosing some specific fields from a record with awk
@Jotne: That makes the output consistent at least, but I disagree with you that that isn't a problem. Ed Morton is correct - it always best practice to print the carriage return. You would need another block in there, like: END { print "\n" }. That said, a multi-character RS isn't ideal anyway, unless you're willing to sacrifice portability.
Apr
25
comment change lowercase file names to uppercase with awk ,sed or bash
@Orwellophile: Correction? I stated the fact almost two years ago. If you have a non-GNU system, then you have other more serious problems than just the case of your filenames.
Apr
20
comment change lowercase file names to uppercase with awk ,sed or bash
@Orwellophile: GNU sed is not BSD sed. BSD is Linux like GNU is Linux.
Apr
15
comment Return number of records per file after processing multiple files
@user2473726: cannot open file *.txt says that your file glob isn't working for some reason (i.e. gawk is expecting a file called '*.txt' which doesn't exist). I think you need to escape the asterisk to get your glob working. Try \*.txt instead. Alternatively, you may not have the 'glob' cygwin environment variable set. See here for details on how to turn it on. Under Linux, I would run the above script like: gawk -f /path/to/script.awk /path/to/files/*.txt. HTH.