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Jan
18
comment Fast way to find string in file in unix
@BalajiBoggaramRamanarayan: I'm not sure what you mean by 'status of cursor'. If you mean 'progress', then I would usually use pv (pipe viewer).
Jan
6
comment Modify Line in File Matching WORD1 and NOT WORD2 (Sed/Awk)
@AaronCopley and others: GNU awk (gawk) v4.1.0 now supports in-place editing: gnu.org/software/gawk/manual/html_node/…
Jan
4
comment Joining values with commas using awk
+1 It's also worth pointing out that there are some quoting issues. For example, this would be better: spid=( $(ps -ef | awk '/LOCAL=NO/ { print $2 }') )
Dec
19
comment Separate all character of a string by FS (awk)
@user3088572: Thanks, but I disagree that that improves readability. If you wanted to use a BEGIN block, it would be better to also define your FS in there too, rather than using it in conjunction with the -F flag. And OFS=// is better written as OFS="". It's also much more awkish/perly to simply return true than it is to use a print statement.
Dec
19
comment Separate all character of a string by FS (awk)
I think you mean FS. IFS is a bash-ism.
Dec
5
comment How do I count number of matched terms and return a value of zero if they don't match?
Are you really expecting + AADAC 1 in your output, or is that a typo?
Dec
4
comment How to write to a file using awk to find a string in between ( ); and add a printline after ; to print the string found?
Why don't you post some sample data and expected output?
Dec
3
comment Merge 2 Types of lines in a file on the basis of session ID
-1 You have not adequately explained your joining technique. For example: on what basis should one merge session=114?
Dec
3
comment Quickest way to split a large file based on text within the file in linux
@NoahSussman: You can do this with BSD awk, try: awk -F, '{ f = substr($2,0,4) ".txt"; print > f }' file. HTH.
Nov
27
comment How to keep only those rows which are unique in a tab-delimited file in unix
@user1140126: Cool. You could use time instead of date: time awk ...
Nov
26
comment std::ofstream, check if file exists before writing
@MattPhillips: But that doesn't seem to have the desired effect.
Nov
24
comment batch rename folder deleting trailing characters
@Napseis: Sure. This is bash parameter substitution, that removes the shortest rear pattern (_*) from the variable. The summary table on this page may be worth a look. Cheers.
Nov
15
comment Perl - DBI and .pgpass
Sorry, ikegami, I hope you don't mind, but I think Craig has the safest answer here and the least points too. Thanks again.
Nov
15
comment Perl - DBI and .pgpass
Actually, I found the answer myself. All I need to do is set: $ENV{'PGSYSCONFDIR'}. Thanks!
Nov
14
comment Perl - DBI and .pgpass
Cool answer. I expected all along that there would be a better way to perform the connection without hard-coding a lot of the connection info into the perl. I have created a ~/.pg_service.conf file with the relevant fields, but I am receiving: ERROR: service file "/etc/sysconfig/pgsql/pg_service.conf" not found. Is there a way to force the connection to look at ~/.pg_service.conf instead?
Nov
14
comment Retrieve the coding amino-acid when there is certain pattern in a DNA sequence
Yes, really only a small amount of perl is needed to get to the answer the OP is looking for. I would avoid awk because eventually the OP will want to convert codons to amino-acids; which would require a look-up table, and I wouldn't want to write one of those up, ever. The OP is looking for patterns, but he's only interested in the parts of those patterns that are in frame. I believe the OP then wants these translated in silico with their counts. Perl (and Python) has modules that can do this.
Nov
14
comment Retrieve the coding amino-acid when there is certain pattern in a DNA sequence
Using awk for this job is not an appropriate tool; unless of course you wish to re-invent the wheel. The years of work put into the BioPerl and BioPython modules need not be wasted. They're there to help.
Nov
14
comment Retrieve the coding amino-acid when there is certain pattern in a DNA sequence
Answering this question would be difficult without some knowledge of molecular biology. Amino acids are coded for in triplets of nucleotides called codons. There are therefore six possible reading frames; three in the forward direction and three in the reverse. The OP is probably only interested in the first frame (i.e. +1), probably because his sample sequences are the beginnings of some genes or ORFs of interest. In these sequences, the first codon, 'ATG', is a common eukaryotic start codon, which, after transcription, would signal the initiation of protein translation.
Nov
12
comment How to search contents of one file in another file which are not exists
@user2642751: Just a random guess, but are you using Solaris? If so, you may need to use /usr/xpg4/bin/awk instead of awk. Regardless, I would install GNU awk sooner rather than later if I were you. It will save a lot of time/effort in the long run.
Nov
12
comment How to search contents of one file in another file which are not exists
@user2642751: Works fine for me using gawk, mawk and nawk. What flavour and version of awk are you using?