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Nov
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
16
awarded  Yearling
Sep
13
answered Best MySQL server configuration for performance?
Jul
26
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
26
awarded  Nice Answer
May
25
comment RegExp to validate a formula (math expression with matched parentheses)?
+1 as you took the words out of my mouth. Although one could get close with backtracking but that is limited and it is, quite frankly, a hack and a sign you're using the wrong tool for the job.
May
25
answered What are best practices for securing the admin section of a website?
May
21
awarded  Popular Question
May
20
answered Is there such a thing as a converter from php to html?
May
20
answered What's the fastest way to scrape a lot of pages in php?
Apr
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
7
accepted Why does the rename() syscall prohibit moving a directory that I can't write to a different directory?
Apr
1
comment PHP: Is there a command that can delete the contents of a file without opening it?
rm -rf is downright dangerous. Why -r when we're expecting only a file, never a directory? Deleting the file has lots of negative side effects, as well. Besides the fact there will be a second it doesn't exist, you'll nuke the ownership/permissions/ctime of the file, and the inode number will change.
Apr
1
answered PHP: Is there a command that can delete the contents of a file without opening it?
Apr
1
comment Why does the rename() syscall prohibit moving a directory that I can't write to a different directory?
A user can rename a directory (or delete a directory) that they can't write, however, they just can't move it to a different directory.
Mar
31
comment Why does the rename() syscall prohibit moving a directory that I can't write to a different directory?
It might help to see ufs_vnops.c yourself and look. The code to update .. is part of the rename syscall, and the simpler thing to do when implementing rename() would have been to not bother checking write permission before actually writing it. Remember, we're in the kernel here, not userspace - it is up to us to decide whether or not we're allowed to do what we're trying. If this behavior is intuitive, I think it's violated by the fact I can create a directory that I can't write using mkdir()
Mar
31
comment Why does the rename() syscall prohibit moving a directory that I can't write to a different directory?
Except, when you look at the code, you see it's doing the write check specifically for this reason (the call to ufs_access) - so this is the code that means you need to be able to write a directory to change .. so I believe your answer is circular reasoning, no?
Mar
31
asked Why does the rename() syscall prohibit moving a directory that I can't write to a different directory?
Mar
30
comment what is faster?
While I believe everyone is right in that this is most likely premature optimization, one can't really know that for sure without knowing more about where this code is running and, perhaps more critically, a profile of where time is spent in the code. If this is happening hundreds of billions of times in a loop and not much else is going on, then perhaps any difference here (although if there's any at all, one does need a new compiler) is significant. Premature optimization sucks, but the whole point is that we can't know where to optimize until we know where we spend our time.
Mar
29
answered how can i sort one array with 2 child using fork() in c