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Oct
15
answered Do we still need subroutines?
Oct
15
comment Why are malloc() and printf() said as non-reentrant?
@Steve: For instance, in the Linux kernel spinlocks typically disable interrupts when the lock is taken. "Normal" sleeping mutexes OTOH run with interrupts enabled.
Oct
15
comment Why are malloc() and printf() said as non-reentrant?
Finally, thank you. I was about to write more or less the same, but your answer appeared just as I was starting to type mine. +1.
Oct
15
comment Why are malloc() and printf() said as non-reentrant?
@RIPUNJAY: A reentrant function is also thread-safe, but a thread-safe function is not necessarily reentrant. And yes, they are two different things. For instance, on systems which support threads malloc() is typically thread-safe, but not reentrant.
Oct
13
answered what is the workaround for floating point inacurracy?
Oct
12
comment Is ARPACK thread-safe?
@Tamas: I updated my answer hopefully answering your further questions.
Oct
12
revised Is ARPACK thread-safe?
clarifications; added 181 characters in body
Oct
10
answered Is ARPACK thread-safe?
Oct
10
comment Is ARPACK thread-safe?
Parallel ARPACK is parallelized with MPI; it might, or then it might not, be thread-safe.
Sep
29
answered Display image as grayscale using matplotlib
Sep
29
answered ATLAS Linear algebra and openmpi on multicore with python
Sep
21
comment Threads: some questions
@Ganesh: Your question makes no sense. I suggest you reread the answers by me, caf, and slacker where we explain what is a process, what is a thread, and what is the relationship between them. Until you understand those fundamental concepts, further discussions about various details are unlikely to be fruitful.
Sep
21
comment Threads: some questions
@Ganesh: GNU pth is a user-space cooperative (=non-preemptive) threading library. Thus the kernel sees a pth-using program as a single thread. This is fairly different from NPTL which is what one normally uses when using POSIX threads on Linux.
Sep
21
comment Threads: some questions
@caf. Right, fixed.
Sep
21
revised Threads: some questions
fix fork
Sep
20
comment Threads: some questions
The OS schedules threads not processes nor address spaces. When at least one of the threads of a process is running, the process itself is considered to be running (even though other threads of the same process might not be running at that point in time). A thread cannot get scheduled "without the process", because without a process the thread wouldn't exist.
Sep
20
comment Threads: some questions
Wrt your third comment, as mentioned in the answers to #6 and #7, processes and threads don't exist independently of each other. Also, the OS schedules threads, not entire processes. When it switches context, it stores the registers and PC value in a per-thread data structure in the kernel.
Sep
20
comment Threads: some questions
I added some more stuff to the answer for #4 to make clear that fork and exec affect the entire process. Hopefully that clears things up for you.
Sep
20
revised Threads: some questions
make clear that fork and exec have nothing to do with threads
Sep
20
answered Threads: some questions