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Dec
18
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
15
awarded  Yearling
Dec
12
comment JMS Outbound Gateway request destination - post process on success
I finally had a chance to run a test and yes, the postSendFlow() is definitely not getting called when I thought it would. Are there any alternatives to make this work? If I were to for example use a JmsOutboundAdapter and a JmsInboundAdapter` instead of a JMS Outbound Gateway, could I still apply a 45 second reply timeout rule for response messages?
Dec
11
revised OpenLDAP 2.3/2.4 concurrency issue
added a comment to say that processing time drops considerably if a slight delay is introduced after each client thread starting
Dec
11
asked OpenLDAP 2.3/2.4 concurrency issue
Dec
10
comment JMS Outbound Gateway request destination - post process on success
I'll give the release with fix a go when available. With regards to your mention of logic: When I first implemented this functionality, I had a configuration where request.ch was a pub-sub channel with only sendReceiveFlow() and postSendFlow() feeding off that pub-sub channel. With that configuration I had the behaviour that you describe but, with the configuration shown in this post, it seems the postSendFlow() is only called when message has been successfully sent to request queue and before message is received from response queue. I'll run a test tomorrow and double-check this...
Dec
10
asked JMS Outbound Gateway request destination - post process on success
Dec
9
answered Split String in small specific length parts and return all those parts
Dec
4
accepted Ensuring Spring Integration deployment's JMS listener threads are cleaned up on Tomcat undeploy
Dec
4
accepted Spring Web Service Endpoint on Tomcat - concurrent calls configuration
Dec
3
answered Spring Web Service Endpoint on Tomcat - concurrent calls configuration
Dec
2
comment Spring Web Service Endpoint on Tomcat - concurrent calls configuration
Hi Gary, the channels directly associated with the gateway are DirectChannels. Further down the flow however, things get a little more complicated depending on how the message is routed. In the perf test I am currently running, the testRouter will route the payload to a PublishSubscribeChannel where the payload is placed in an MQ queue. The reason this is a pub-sub channel is that we do other work once we know the payload has successfully been put in the queue. Thereafter, the response eventually arrives via a JMS Inbound Adapter and sent to the test.response.ch back to the Gateway.
Dec
2
revised Spring Web Service Endpoint on Tomcat - concurrent calls configuration
Added some Test Configuration Code
Dec
2
asked Spring Web Service Endpoint on Tomcat - concurrent calls configuration
Nov
25
comment Spring Integration - Routing back first message in Splitter List before other messages in List
Ok, I've removed the Router's Poller configuration but left the executor with a fixed thread pool size (as opposed to a default cached thread pool). The use of the fixed thread pool (with a small-ish max. number of threads) over the cached thread pool certainly makes a difference to how quickly the response business message is processed over the other business messages. Thanks again for your help.
Nov
25
accepted Spring Integration - Routing back first message in Splitter List before other messages in List
Nov
25
comment Spring Integration - Routing back first message in Splitter List before other messages in List
That's worked nicely Gary, thanks. To add, I have created the executor with a fixed thread pool size, and then configured a Poller on the Router to poll for n messages every 100ms. This way, I know roughly the response will be sent pretty quickly as one of those n messages within that 100ms poll.
Nov
25
asked Spring Integration - Routing back first message in Splitter List before other messages in List
Nov
19
accepted JMS Outbound Gateway response read throttling
Nov
19
comment JMS Outbound Gateway response read throttling
Having reviewed the SI flow as a whole, and pretty much along the lines of what you are saying... it turns out we don't actually need to throttle on the JMS Outbound Gateway at all. Instead, we are now throttling on the initial JMS Inbound Adapter at the start of the whole flow by means of setting a Poller as well as a ThreadPoolExecutor (not shown in the code snippet above!). I suppose this is synonymous to what you meant with regards to setting the Poller on the input-channel. Thanks for the handy tip!