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I really ought to have more written here...


Jul
24
comment Python: self vs type(self) and the proper use of class variables
I meant just regular methods of a class. There is some example code below - seems the question itself was understood despite the need for a few clarifications.
Jul
24
comment Python: self vs type(self) and the proper use of class variables
@AndrewJohnson - Thanks for the detail and the advice! I'll give a closer look at meta-classes as well.
Jul
24
comment Python: self vs type(self) and the proper use of class variables
Would "self" alone would work to override a class variable with a new class variable in a subclass? I can see it creating an instance variable... about all I can see working is an assignment to subclass.classvar.
Jul
24
revised Python: self vs type(self) and the proper use of class variables
added 536 characters in body
Jul
24
comment Python: self vs type(self) and the proper use of class variables
Considering 2.6, 2.7 and 3.x, do you know of any such differing effects? And again, you recommend which construction - classname.classvar or type(self).classvar or something else?
Jul
24
comment Python: self vs type(self) and the proper use of class variables
I could put "change" or "modify" in quotes, but yes, I got and get that fact. One could modify mutable class variables using self alone (because references), but I wanted to know if (for clarity) one should always use a type(self).classvar (or classname.classvar) construction when working with class variables, and avoid any side-effect of using "self" alone.
Jul
24
comment Python: self vs type(self) and the proper use of class variables
That was a long way around the block... So, direct as in classname.classvar or type(self).classvar or some other construction?
Jul
24
comment Python: self vs type(self) and the proper use of class variables
Your point about explicitly using the class name is interesting... though I wonder if there is a cleaner way to do it than explicitly sprinkling the class name throughout. As for the example, yes, if you assign a new list "[1]" you'll shadow the class variable. But if you change the existing list (e.g., append) then you don't create a new object (while changing an immutable would always create a new object - shadowing being mediated only by the use of the class name or "self").
Jul
24
asked Python: self vs type(self) and the proper use of class variables
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
10
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
4
awarded  Self-Learner
May
19
awarded  Yearling
May
8
comment AMQPConnectionError using Pika and RabbitMQ with Asyncore - why?
Upvoted and approved, and noted in the bug report - thanks again for your help!
May
8
accepted AMQPConnectionError using Pika and RabbitMQ with Asyncore - why?
May
8
comment AMQPConnectionError using Pika and RabbitMQ with Asyncore - why?
Thank you! I filed a bug a little while ago (github.com/pika/pika/issues/468). I will add a note referencing this thread... maybe my choice of Asyncore was not optimal given my criteria (I'm thinking Tornado may be a preferable 2.7/3.4 solution) but it still should work.
May
8
revised AMQPConnectionError using Pika and RabbitMQ with Asyncore - why?
Added a version number
May
8
comment AMQPConnectionError using Pika and RabbitMQ with Asyncore - why?
Well, I do appreciate the tip on the logging thing... I'm just baffled by the Asyncore problem. Might file a bug.
May
8
revised AMQPConnectionError using Pika and RabbitMQ with Asyncore - why?
Problem is platform independent
May
8
revised AMQPConnectionError using Pika and RabbitMQ with Asyncore - why?
Greater clarification