865 reputation
719
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Jul 18 at 18:17

Mar
25
comment Calling the 'hex' builtin from the python C API
It is documented; see docs.python.org/3.3/c-api/number.html
Mar
25
comment Calling the 'hex' builtin from the python C API
Thanks! I should have looked in the abstract number protocol API, not the concrete integer API... :)
Mar
25
comment Calling the 'hex' builtin from the python C API
@MarkReed As in, pull hex from the built-ins dict then PyObject_Call it? I see that that would certainly work. (It seems like roughly the same amount of work as calling format as I propose below.) But I couldn't help wondering whether there was an easier/more canonical way.
Mar
4
comment Data.ByteString output not correct
Yes, it really has been a while since the maintainer promised a fix 'real soon now' (see the answer in the other question). I guess the workaround is not too tricky though. The biggest issue (at least for me) is that this behavior is such a surprise... if there was a warning in the docs, it would be better!
Mar
4
comment Transform a function with a typeclass constraint into a function taking an explicit typeclass dictionary
@TomEllis: that's a beautiful article! As it happens, that article describes the idea behind the solution which I allude to in my comment above (the one that uses unsafeCoerce and the implementation details of newtype ) I learnt the trick from Edward's post here: mail-archive.com/haskell-cafe@haskell.org/msg57747.html which is much more telegraphic and consequently less clear! Anyway, I'd still love to see a solution which relies less on the implementation details of ghc, but I'm beginning to think there's no other way to do it... :)
Mar
4
comment Transform a function with a typeclass constraint into a function taking an explicit typeclass dictionary
@StephenDiehl: I'm aware that it's tricky. I'm doing it in the context of a larger task, but I'm fairly certain that I'm forced to do this and can't find a way around it. (I do think it's possible, as I said above, just ugly.)
Mar
4
comment Transform a function with a typeclass constraint into a function taking an explicit typeclass dictionary
As you guess, this is not a solution because it is very special case. As well as the issue you raise with example2, you would also have problems if my_fn had a signature like my_fn :: X t -> t for some type X of kind * -> *. How would you turn an X t into an X (Wrapper t) in general, without making assumptions about X?
Mar
3
comment Transform a function with a typeclass constraint into a function taking an explicit typeclass dictionary
@DanielWagner: I have looked into that somewhat, but I didn't think it solved the problem cleanly. I do know of a solution which uses the reflection pkg amongst other things. BUT it is very ugly and relies on unsafeCoerce and implementation details of GHC's newtype so I'm hoping the hive mind will come up with something better.
Jul
24
comment Read a unicode file in python which declares its encoding in the same way as python source
@PiotrDobrogost for the UTF8 decoding thing, you're right. It makes more sense to think about it the way you say (error if you see any bytes above \x7f unless you've seen the BOM, o'wise decode), but on the other hand I think that what I said (first decode, then error if you get any decode errors or if the result contains unicode chars above \u7f) is equivalent, and was as it happens the way I was thinking of things. BTW, would you like to see my Python code for this? (It's actually not 100% faithful to the algo above in that my code does recognize UTF16 BOMs, unlike python's interpreter).
Jul
22
comment Read a unicode file in python which declares its encoding in the same way as python source
@PiotrDobrogost: "Unless you have seen the UTF-8 BOM, generate an error message if you see any non-ASCII characters". I think this is correct as written. The rule is: if you (a) see a non-ASCII character and (b) you have not seen a UTF-8 BOM, then you should generate an error. (If you see a non ASCII character but did see a UTF-8 BOM, then you don't make an error message; and obviously if all the characters are ASCII you don't make an error message.) Hope this clarifies things. Please ask more questions if I'm still being unclear and/or it looks like I am really mistaken here.
Jul
22
comment Read a unicode file in python which declares its encoding in the same way as python source
@PiotrDobrogost : You do treat \r as a valid EOL character. The point is that if character immediately following the \r is a \n, then that \n must be 'eaten' as part of the line ending with the \r and not treated as part of the next line. If the character immediately following the \r is anything other than \n, then it should instead be left in the stream to be the first character of the next line. That's why you need the 'put back' logic described.
Jun
8
comment Windows cmd encoding change causes Python crash
@David-Sarah: Thanks for the very useful code! Do you happen to know if there's a corresponding way to fix console input (so that e.g. copy-pasted unicode characters Just Work, irrespective of codepage etc.) This would presumably involve ReadConsoleW?
May
29
comment Unicode console I/O in Haskell on Windows
@DanielWagner; OTOH, assuming there are no other replies, and if you think maintainers would welcome a suggested patch, I'd be very happy to tidy up the above as a library proposal, time permitting.
May
29
comment Unicode console I/O in Haskell on Windows
@DanielWagner: Well, I guess it might be worth waiting a little while to see if anyone else has a suggestion here... I'm fairly certain that what I do above is 'right' from a Win32/Unicode point of view; less certain it's the best interface to expose in Haskell. Another thing is that I would probably need a nontrivial amount of hand-holding from the senior maintainers were I to try to make this 'official': I've never hacked the core Haskell libraries before. So (given that the issue has been officially ranked low priority) I worry that this might be wasting senior maintainers' time.
May
28
comment Non-lazy branch of GHC
Certainly Credit Suisse had built a system for financial modelling based on Haskell called the paradise project. I believe that Prof Augustsson may have worked on it. I also believe that much of the team, including Prof Augustsson, then moved to Standard Chartered Bank...
Aug
5
comment Lock-free programming in Haskell
@AxMan6, @sclv. I see how this works, but I do have one worry: is the 'black hole' mechanism implemented using locks? If it is, then your solution will (it seems to me) cause you to end up using the implicit locks inside the black holes. So for this to be a 'lock free' solution we need to know the black holes are lock free. (Contrariwise, if the B.H.s aren't lock free, to write lock free code you'll need to evaluate to WHNF---or probably even NF---before the atomicModifyIORef, and suggests you still need a compare/set primitive.)
Aug
4
comment Lock-free programming in Haskell
Also: is the black hole mechanism implemented using locks? (In GHC.)
Aug
4
comment Lock-free programming in Haskell
Right! I agree, MVars are just simply locks; the question was worded non-optimally. I agree that I want to use IORefs and atomic modification. But atomicModifyIORef isn't the only lock-free primitive you might want---critically, one might want a compare-and-set! primitive which modifies an IORef only if its current value is still what you expected it to be...
Aug
4
comment Lock-free programming in Haskell
OK, fair enough! Although I'm still interested if anyone has more detailed information (or can point to such...)
Aug
4
comment Lock-free programming in Haskell
Thanks---I knew of STM (see edit above) but didn't know so much about how it's implemented internally. Is it lock free? Mostly lock free? Also, are any lower-level lock-free primitives exposed?