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Apr
7
comment If statement always true with enum in comparison
Your issue is most likely due to a race condition. Something is changing the values on another thread. Implement some logging logic in your TypeOfRoom setter, identifying the current thread . You'll probably find some unexpected results; more than one thread is messing with your room.
Apr
7
comment If statement always true with enum in comparison
you need to post more code. Show us your Room class and specifically your TypeOfRoom getter and setter (I'm assuming it is a property).
Apr
7
comment I want to split string with “,” but from 2nd comma(,)
What have you tried? What problems are you encountering. This is not a place where people will simply get your job done.
Mar
8
comment Implementing IEnumerable<T> using… IEnumerable<T>
@Lee. Oh, I didn't know that, thanks! I understand from your answer then that this is a common approach to the problem and its perfectyl fine to implement an iterator this way?
Mar
8
asked Implementing IEnumerable<T> using… IEnumerable<T>
Feb
28
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
19
comment Coding a relative path to file in OS X
@user2407038 I normally execute a scrip file located in the source directoy that deletes *.o files and such and launches the executable. Even if I manually run the executable by double clicking on it,I get the same error. I know very little about OS X but I can't quite figure out how the executable can be starting in a different directory in such circumstances. You are right thought about making this platform independent and will look into System.Directory
Feb
18
asked Coding a relative path to file in OS X
Feb
17
comment Chaining actions sharing data in a do block
@Jubobs duh...(facepalm) Thanks!
Feb
17
asked Chaining actions sharing data in a do block
Feb
9
accepted Getting the callee's name of an extension method
Feb
9
comment Getting the callee's name of an extension method
Thanks, this is pretty interesting. Is doing something similar form an extension method even possible? I can live with Validate a being normal static method but I am curious as to why it being an extension method makes things harder.
Feb
9
revised Getting the callee's name of an extension method
deleted 8 characters in body
Feb
9
asked Getting the callee's name of an extension method
Feb
3
comment Why is double-to-int cast being assigned to a dynamic variable redundant according to ReSharper?
And you should generalize this to any cast. Even if its not a particularly good design, what happens if there is some kind of side effect in a user defined cast operator? Maybe some logging logic, throwing an exception under certain disallowed object states, warning the FBI that someone cast TopSecretObject, what have you. The point being, in the general case, a cast can not be considered redundant ever in C# unless you are absolutely sure it is: Lion simba; object o = (Animal)simba; //Cast to Animal is redundant.
Feb
3
comment Why is double-to-int cast being assigned to a dynamic variable redundant according to ReSharper?
This is going nowhere. Your answer states, and I will quote it again bolding out the relevant part: "I think this is because the cast is redundant as far as C# is concerned". As far as C# is concerned, the cast is most definitely not redundant at all, end of story When will the compiler do that conversion for you if it's redundant? What happens if the double is boxed and then someone expecting an int unboxes it with a direct cast?. Did you mean to say something else? Then rephrase your answer to make it more precise, as it stands now it conveys an incorrect message.
Feb
3
comment Why is double-to-int cast being assigned to a dynamic variable redundant according to ReSharper?
Whichever way you want to dress it, your answer is wrong. A cast that is not a simple reference conversion can not be flagged as redundant because it isn't, simple as that. This case makes it obvious, I'm not sure what you are trying to discuss here, the code is prefectly fine, the warning isn't. It's not anyone's job to make Resharper's life easier; it should be smart enough to know when a cast is not a simple reference conversion, if it's not then it is a bug or false positive, whatever you like to name it.
Feb
3
comment Why is double-to-int cast being assigned to a dynamic variable redundant according to ReSharper?
Resharper shouldn't be giving this warning at all. Seems like a bug. A cast that isn't a simple reference conversion shouldn't be flagged as it can obviously not be redundant as is your case.
Feb
3
comment Why is double-to-int cast being assigned to a dynamic variable redundant according to ReSharper?
"I think this is because the cast is redundant as far as c# is concerned". This affirmation is absolutely wrong. Casting a Tiger to Animal might be redundant "as far as c# is concerned" in the given context, casting double to int is not redundant in any way; you are creating an absolutely new object, not simply changing the type of the reference. Resharper shouldn't be giving this warning.