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Aug
5
awarded  Necromancer
Jul
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
13
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
25
comment The case against checked exceptions
Why is it dangerous to report "genuine bugs" at the request boundary or outermost handler??? I frequently work in systems integration & reliability, where correct reliability engineering is actually important, and use "unchecked exception" approaches to do so. I'm not really sure what you're actually debating -- seems like you might want to actually spend 3 months in the unchecked exception way, get a feel for it, and then perhaps we can discuss further. Thanks.
Jun
17
comment The case against checked exceptions
Incorrect. Outermost handler's job is to fail cleanly & log errors on the 'request' boundary. Broken request fails properly, exception is reported, thread is able to continue to service next request. Such an outermost handler is a standard feature in Tomcat, AWT, Spring, EJB containers & the Java 'main' thread.
Jun
15
comment The case against checked exceptions
Outermost handler catches Exception, logs it, and returns a "failed" response or shows an error dialog. Very simple, not hard to define at all. The point is that every exception not immediately & locally recoverable, is an unrecoverable failure due to principle of encapsulation. If the code that's meant to know about can't recover it, then the request overall fails cleanly & properly. This is the right way to do it properly.
Jun
15
comment The case against checked exceptions
My answer already above addresses this. First and foremost, 1) Outermost failure handler should catch everything. Beyond that, for specific identified sites only, 2) Specific expected contingencies can be caught and handled -- at the immediate site they are thrown. That means file not found, insufficient funds etc at the point these could be recovered from -- no higher. Principle of encapsulation means that outer layers cannot/ should not be responsible to understand/ recover from failures deep inside. Third, 3) Everything else should be thrown outwards -- unchecked if possible.
Jun
11
comment The case against checked exceptions
My point is to fail properly as the general strategy. Unchecked exceptions help that as they do not force catch blocks to be interposed. Catching & error-logging can then be left to a few outermost handlers, rather than miscoded thousands of times throughout the codebase (which is actually what hides bugs). For arbitrary failures, unchecked exceptions are absolutely most correct. Contingencies -- predictable outcomes such as insufficient funds -- are the only exceptions legitimately are worth making checked.
Jun
11
comment JAXB creating context and marshallers cost
Please specify this in the Javadoc. It's not satisfactory to have these crucial aspects undocumented.
Jun
11
comment JAXB creating context and marshallers cost
Javadoc has always been weak on the crucial facts of lifecycle. It sure gives us trivial repetition of property getters & setters, but as to knowing how/where to get or create an instance, mutation & thread-safety.. it seems to completely miss those most-important factors. Sigh :)
Jun
1
awarded  Revival
May
25
awarded  Yearling
May
8
awarded  Announcer
Apr
27
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
26
comment Eclipse + Maven Plugin + EGit Plugin = Checkout from GitHub a specific Branche and Tag?
Not a complete answer for Maven projects, requires further manual steps & hacking the project/ build nature up to get it work. Perhaps a better answer here: stackoverflow.com/a/7269917/768795
Apr
19
awarded  Constituent
Apr
18
awarded  Caucus
Apr
16
comment Writing a custom http server, does supporting AJAX require extra code over HTTP GET?
Nor really the luxury of safely & reliability with arbitrarily large requests/ data, which HTTP Requests and AJAX (as XML/JSON) often tend to expose. Which is why I wished him good luck. Now lighten up & stop being such a grump, @A.R.
Apr
12
comment Writing a custom http server, does supporting AJAX require extra code over HTTP GET?
@A.R. From my perspective, logging program activity is a fundamental of software engineering as opposed to cowboy coding. Error logging approaches in C typically take either of two approaches: 1) allocate & grow a buffer for the message, as it's built. 2) allocate a buffer with a fixed maximum. Now, I'm fundamentally concerned by error-logging which may itself be a source of error.. buffer overflows or OOM. These concerns are especially acute with web requests/ XML, which may be quite arbitrarily large, in a constrained embedded environment. Now do you mind changing it to an upvote?