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Dec
5
comment C Programming Exercise from the K&R Book
works on my compiler. thanks anyway.
Dec
5
comment C Programming Exercise from the K&R Book
Thanks but I'll stick with %lf, like the good book says #include <stdio.h> int main(void) { long float x = 3.14159265358979; float y = 3.14159265358979f; printf("%15.10f\n", y); /* 3.1415927410 / printf("%15.10lf\n", x); / 3.1415926536 */ return 0; }
Dec
5
comment Infinite loops - top or bottom?
Ya, I have observed the same thing. I pop in an infinite loop, and morph the code to meet the unit test. Before I can blink, I see that it can be turned into a normal loop construct.
Dec
5
comment Delete all but the 50 newest rows
Nice comment, thanks for pointing that out.
Dec
5
comment C Programming Exercise from the K&R Book
CTRL Z in dos land
Dec
4
comment testing classes
Ya. I didn't find the other SO question when I looked. Thanks eJames.
Dec
4
comment testing classes
Yep. I see your point. Unit testing is being used with a wrong definition.
Dec
4
comment Are memory leaks ever ok?
Interesting approach. I would be a bit concerned about processes that fail to exit and continue to gobble up memory.
Dec
4
comment How can I remove the first line of a text file using bash/sed script?
The second solution has the implication that the file is not shrunk by the first line each time. The program simply processes it, as if it had been shrunk, but starting at the next line each time
Dec
3
comment using a vector of column names, to generate a sql statement
I refer of course to extra tests within the body of the loop, or additional processing outside the loop, to remove the final comma :)
Dec
2
comment How do I convert a double into a string in C++?
That still sounds like a call for objects. A union would work. Each the object to insert various values into it, and have it self validate.
Dec
1
comment How do I convert a double into a string in C++?
Why convert it at all? Store it in the map as a double, and avoid the conversion to and from.
Nov
29
comment I need to store postal codes in a database. How big should the column be?
Yes breaking the us zip code into 5 and 4 digits can make sense, depending on what you plan on using it for. For example, if you are doing some sort of address matching, you might want to match on the zip5 first, and resolve ambigueous situations with the zip 9. It also helps to use a country code
Nov
29
comment I need to store postal codes in a database. How big should the column be?
Well, assuming we are coding in something silly like Pro*C, having the field large enough for growth means the code won't need to be touched should the usage increase.
Nov
29
comment using a vector of column names, to generate a sql statement
It simplifies things nicely. One could abuse the technique to do the column and values in an insert statement.
Nov
29
comment using a vector of column names, to generate a sql statement
Looks like it works. It is similar to the second example I provided.
Nov
29
comment using a vector of column names, to generate a sql statement
looks rather complicated.
Nov
29
comment using a vector of column names, to generate a sql statement
Looks clean too, with no tests.
Nov
28
comment I need to store postal codes in a database. How big should the column be?
one would point out that sorting by country and postal code will result in cheaper postal rates in some places.
Nov
28
comment IDE for Pl/SQL development
I don't think that one is free