Kristian Domagala

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bio website kristian-domagala.blogspot.co…
location Brisbane, Australia
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Feb
13
comment how to simplify this expression in Scala?
Good catch, and serves me right for not putting it through the compiler first!
Feb
13
comment Combining 2 Options into 1
My point was more that if the two Some cases can't happen, then it would be better to encode that in the type system. If there are 2 Option[T] values, then it must be assumed that they can both be Some. The orElse answer that Ben gave prioritises one option over the other, which may be valid. Using Option[Either[T,T]] though removes the need to make that decision.
Feb
12
comment how to simplify this expression in Scala?
You should be able to use foreach by specifying an argument like this: r.right.foreach(i => account.setAccountUuid(i.toString). Alternatively, r.right.map(_.toString).foreach(account.setAccountUuid).
Feb
12
comment Reduce boilerplate with function composition
Yury: true, and this would be an issue if f has side-effects. I can't think of anything similar that would get around that. Yann: I don't have enough context to diagnose what the problem with the scalaz solution is.
Jan
16
comment Scala: Silently catch all exceptions
+1 to all the comments about not doing this for ALL Throwable instances. Ignoring some JVM errors, eg OutOfMemoryError, can leave the JVM in an inconsistent state leading to subtle bugs that are extremely difficult to diagnose and have the potential to cause silent data corruption (depending on the program).
Dec
18
comment Transform an M[A => B] to an A => M[B]
My previous comment was written in response to "what's the difference between map and mapply", which is how I remember your original comment was worded. The benefit is code reuse (see the edit). transform is essentially mapply with the arguments rearranged.
Dec
18
comment Transform an M[A => B] to an A => M[B]
They are two different functions, however, mapply can be written in terms of map. If you change fs to f and expand the placeholder in your implementation, you'll see it's essentially the same implementation as mapply: f map ((ff: A => B) => ff(a)), compared to map(f)((ff: A => B) => ff(a))
Dec
12
comment What is the best way to create a list from optional items in scala?
If all of the values are Some, it won't fail. Try it with one of the values set to None.
Nov
12
comment What's the difference between currying and multiple parameter lists?
Fair point. I won't be holding my breath on unification though; not in Scala anyway ;-)
Nov
12
comment What's the difference between currying and multiple parameter lists?
It might be worth mentioning for completeness that Function2 also has a tupled method, taking the function from (A,B) => C to ((A,B)) => C. Adding to the potential confusion, Scala's optional parentheses feature gives the ability to call both forms as f(a,b).
Oct
22
comment Implementing Monoid[Option[A]] Compile-time Error
I'm not sure what the context is, nor do I think the comments section is the best forum to discuss. I suggest posing your query as a new question (with the appropriate context). If you are on IRC, you should also be able to find help in #scalaz on freenode, where, among others, the authors of FP In Scala sometimes hang out.
Oct
22
comment Implementing Monoid[Option[A]] Compile-time Error
Aside, I'm not familiar with the FP In Scala book, but I would assume the general type class "pattern" would be covered there. This tutorial might also be of use: eed3si9n.com/learning-scalaz
Oct
22
comment Implementing Monoid[Option[A]] Compile-time Error
It means if you already have an implicit instance of Monoid[A] in scope, you can omit the argument to the optionMonoid call. Eg, implicit val monoidForA: Monoid[A] = ...; val monoidForOptionA: Monoid[Option[A]] = optionMoinoid;. More commonly, you'd already have a pre-defined implicit Monad[A] somewhere that you would then import to bring into scope.
Sep
25
comment Get Long from a string using Scala
This might be fine for trusted data, but fails when there are no digits in the string. Depending on the use case, you might be better off in the long run to parse the string (eg, using a regex like Randall Schulz suggested) and explicitly dealing with unexpected formats.
Jun
13
comment What does the tilde (~) mean in this Scala example?
More generally, a whatever b means a.whatever(b) (with the exception of some keywords, primitive operators, and the left-associative indicator you already mentioned).
Jun
12
comment Sum of even-numbered items in Seq
filter followed by map can be done together with collect. So in this case you can write: List(1,3,1,3).zipWithIndex.collect{ case (i,idx) if idx % 2 == 0 => i}.sum
Apr
23
comment Type bound for two unrelated types
Minor point; the last line is the same as the third last line - perhaps you meant m(Left(new MyClassB)) or m(Right(new MyClassA)). Also, for conciseness, in the body of m, you can use a.fold(a => a.methodA(), b => b.methodB()), or even a.fold(_.methodA(), _.methodB())
Apr
16
comment what is the input type of classOf
In that case, my second comment stands. You technically could use strings and convert them to a Class[_] using java.lang.Class.forName(...), but that's prone to all the problems associated with reflection.
Apr
15
comment what is the input type of classOf
If class1 is a class definition, I suspect you'll have to use EECOLOR's solution of Seq(classOf[com.mypackage.class1],...).foreach(registerClass)
Apr
15
comment what is the input type of classOf
Can you show what com.mypackage.class1 looks like? And what is the method signature of register on kryo?