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Dec
23
comment AVFoundation capture UIImage
Good point, I updated the answer to use the top-level header. Thanks Cameron.
Dec
23
revised AVFoundation capture UIImage
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Oct
24
awarded  Enlightened
Oct
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
23
comment How to print Bytes in order in a endian-portable way?
See my edit for a macro way to do this, if you exclusively use it with printf().
Oct
23
revised How to print Bytes in order in a endian-portable way?
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Oct
23
answered How to print Bytes in order in a endian-portable way?
Oct
16
revised Undefined reference error in C
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Oct
16
revised Undefined reference error in C
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Oct
16
answered Undefined reference error in C
Oct
13
answered How do I plot output data once I have compiled a program in Xcode?
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awarded  Yearling
Mar
20
comment For how long do the recv() functions buffer in UDP?
Interesting, that's good to know. I wonder, if you're on an x64 machine and pass setsockopt a size_t and sizeof(size_t) (8 bytes) is that OK? I suppose casting from any larger type to a smaller type is guaranteed to receive the least significant bits, which would be OK in this case - you'll end up with the value you wanted, as a u32. I guess it still begs the question, why pass in a type which is potentially 8 bytes when you could just make bufSize an unsigned int.
Mar
19
comment For how long do the recv() functions buffer in UDP?
From the man page, "Most socket-level options utilize an int parameter for option_value." In practice, size_t will have a platform-dependant size which could be equal to an int on 32-bit platform, or double that on 64-bit platforms. Additionally, if setsockopt treats bufSize as an int, asking for too large a buffer could then be read as a negative number (though it's unlikely you'd ask for that large a buffer)... Either way, I would stick with an int.
Mar
17
answered Segmentation Fault when accessing string array modified by a function in C
Mar
11
answered Do Audio Queue Services buffers need to be even multiples of packet size?