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May
22
suggested approved edit on “Mathematical state” with functional languages?
May
21
awarded  Analytical
May
20
revised HsOpenSSL segfaults on OS X
added 35 characters in body
May
20
revised HsOpenSSL segfaults on OS X
Added results of testing against OpenSSL v1.0.1e
May
20
revised HsOpenSSL segfaults on OS X
Updated title, post after further testing
May
20
comment HsOpenSSL segfaults on OS X
@FedorGogolev, I added version info to the question. I'm installing and building everything for GHC 7.6.3 now, and I'll report back with those results in a bit.
May
20
comment HsOpenSSL segfaults on OS X
@Thomas M. DuBuisson, thanks for checking. That's what I would have expected; the problem is likely something to do with OS X.
May
20
revised HsOpenSSL segfaults on OS X
Added version info
May
20
revised HsOpenSSL segfaults on OS X
Made both shell prompts the same
May
20
asked HsOpenSSL segfaults on OS X
May
19
accepted How do you say `\x -> y`?
Apr
29
awarded  Organizer
Apr
29
revised Haskell pointless performance - efficiently map multiple functions to the same data
edited tags
Apr
17
revised what is the meaning of “let x = x in x” and “data Float#” in GHC.Prim in Haskell
Added footnote to steer those unfamiliar with fixed-point recursion in the right direction
Apr
17
revised In matplotlib, how do you draw R-style axis ticks that point outward from the axes?
Better title, clarity
Apr
17
revised Python 'with' statement - how to tell what module/object/class supports it?
Clarity
Apr
17
revised what is the meaning of “let x = x in x” and “data Float#” in GHC.Prim in Haskell
Clarified primop, exposition of how to translate let expression to lambda terms
Apr
17
revised what is the meaning of “let x = x in x” and “data Float#” in GHC.Prim in Haskell
Clarified what a primop is
Apr
14
comment What does uncurry ($) do?
This code illustrates the power of thinking in types. Figuring out what uncurry ($) does take a bit of thought, but it should be apparent right off what a function of type (a -> b, a) -> b does. In fact, there is only one thing a function with that type can do. You should develop this intuition naturally if you pay attention to types as you program in Haskell. If you later want to formalize your intuition, try the paper "Theorems for free" [PDF] by Philip Wadler
Apr
11
awarded  Nice Answer