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May
18
comment Merging custom configuration sections at runtime in .NET
My bad, it seems you are actually answering my question indirectly, as the ExeConfigurationFileMap was indeed the way to go, it just seemed a little wrong to (ab)use it in the way I wanted. Still, I fear I will hardly find an alternative, and you deserve some credit or pointing this to me.
May
17
comment Merging custom configuration sections at runtime in .NET
I will try to investigate why it is so, but my wild guess it is there is an internal .NET logic that makes sure the machine config is always taken into account. I suppose there are settings which are not meant to be available via custom app/web config files, and without these the .NET framework might be unable to operate. In fact, I am glad it is still taken into account, as I could benefit from the approach in a web application as well.
May
16
comment ASP.NET Web API - PUT & DELETE Verbs Not Allowed - IIS 8
One should not mess with other than the application configuration file. First- you will do this for the entire server and forget, then many people will wonder how it works on this machine and doesn't work on the rest. Also, if you are not allowed access to the IIS config file on the server where the application is hosted, you will have to work it out in the web.config. Imagine your dev server has the above update, will your web.config be accurate? It is a great way to loose someone's day on investigating why the production deployment has failed
May
16
comment ASP.NET Web API - PUT & DELETE Verbs Not Allowed - IIS 8
I don't think you need custom headers at all in this case. The rest of the system.webserver section should suffice - just make sure you have the right name for the extensionless url handler.
May
16
comment ASP.NET Web API - PUT & DELETE Verbs Not Allowed - IIS 8
This answer is correct with the only exception that the handler name may differ across IIS versions - for instance 7.5 uses "ExtensionlessUrlHandler-Integrated-4.0" (as in above answer) while IIS 8.5 has this renamed to "ExtensionlessUrl-Integrated-4.0" (also mentioned by Mark S. The name of the handler is shown in the IIS error page, once you receive the error, so it should be trivial to know which to set. I use both names in order to support different hosting environments.
May
16
comment ASP.NET Web API - PUT & DELETE Verbs Not Allowed - IIS 8
In addition, I also needed to remove the WebDAVModule from the modules section, as per Santosh Sah's answer.
May
15
comment Suppress properties with null value on ASP.Net Web API
Since Json.NET 5 (not sure for previous versions), you can also do this: config.Formatters.JsonFormatter.SerializerSettings.NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore - this will update the null value handling without resetting any other json serialization settings (like using lower case on the first letter of properties)
May
14
comment Merging custom configuration sections at runtime in .NET
The point is that when I create the ExeConfigurationFileMap I am explicitly saying map.MachineConfigFilename = PathToCustomConfig. The point is that the exe config is merged with what I say to be the machine config. Shouldn't this ignore the real machine.config or am I missing something?
May
14
comment Merging custom configuration sections at runtime in .NET
Hi, it seems your idea got me even closer to what I desire. Checkout my wiki post to this question. I'd be glad if you can elaborate on some of the cons - particularly If I am losing what is in machine.config, and if I can have more than 2 files merged. I tried to work with RoamingUserConfigFilename but it seemed not to work.
May
12
comment JDBC and ADO.Net: API comparison
Also this old MSDN resource adds up with the comparison: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa478977.aspx and has a good explanation on the disconnected and connected models.
May
12
comment Why can't I reference System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations?
Well, this is really wrong. If you make a project element be treated as "Content" during build, it will lose its behavior. So if you do it on a class, it will no longer be compiled and it's code won't be called ever. Instead it will be copied as a file along the binaries of the program compilation output. That is why you will stop receiving compilation errors, but it is definitely not a solution to a compilation problem.
May
11
comment Merging custom configuration sections at runtime in .NET
Although this does not answer my question, I must thank you for the hint it provides - if I am able to detect which sections have been declared in custom.config and app.config (seems your answer addresses that part quite well), I will already have the exact section objects I need to merge. Now I should find a way to trigger that ... merging.
May
11
comment Merging custom configuration sections at runtime in .NET
@SimonMourier, thank you for the hint. However, this seems to help in splitting the config file into more convenient locations (unless I am missing something). I am more interested in layering the settings between different config files with similar structure - for instance if both app.config and custom.config defined element 'custom element', I need to obtain a merged version of it from both files. when I use ConfigurationManager.GetSection(...). I hope this clarifies my requirement a little more.
May
9
comment Can you use reflection to find the name of the currently executing method?
I wonder why woud you use new StackTrace(true) instead of new StackTrace(false). Setting that to true will cause the stack trace to atttempt capturing the file name, line number and etc, which might make this call slower. Otherwise, a nice answer
May
8
comment Merging custom configuration sections at runtime in .NET
I have updated my post, btw. Does the scenario I mention now make any difference, or is still that impossible.
May
8
comment Merging custom configuration sections at runtime in .NET
Thank you for the honest answer and I appreciate the sample link, I will take look into it. I admit I am kinda disappointed to learn it is indeed so inflexible, the System Configuration. It really seemed to have the potential for my goals, but as if it was "playing hard to get". I should have been thinking of alternatives now, if I was not that stubborn..., but that's another tale
May
8
comment Merging custom configuration sections at runtime in .NET
@stakx, maybe you're correct. Still, since the .NET framework itself exposes merging capabilities (and does this merging internally), it must be possible to at least understand how it all happens. I have managed to do a lot for easing the configuration in most of my projects, yet still this merging capability is the missing piece of the puzzle I am looking for from a long time.
May
8
comment System.Linq.Expressions.ExpressionVisitor is inaccessible due to its protection level
Useful to know. I am still supporting 3.5 codebases and I eventually came here because most examples were using the ExpressionVisitor class as it would be a valid base class. Good to know an alternative version exists.
May
4
comment Take the greater of two nullable values
I really appreciate this answer, as it is both short and creative, still I do not think that safe and short code has to suffer reduced performance (in general). If you need to handle a case where you must use nullable types (with the performance drawback), it is not a good enough reason to forget about performance at all. So, I would disagree with you when you say C# is not to write high-performance code. You may not be able match the speed of native code, but if taken seriously, performance can be significantly improved with some best-practices and compiler-optimization friendly code.
Apr
30
comment Are there any guidelines for the usage of namespace in big projects?
The reverse domain notation is the thing you are suggesting. It is adopted as a standard naming convensions for Java-based and Apple software, but is not the standard way to organize components in the .NET world. Both the official .NET assemblies, the Mono project and nearly the entire .NET dev community have agreed to conform to the Pascal Case standard. There is no restriction, nor it is a crime, to use reverse domain names in .NET, but your project's components will seem awkward to use by the community who are used to the standard