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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 16 votes cast
Apr
24
answered -lstdc++ to LIBADD option stripped in libtool archive
Apr
24
asked -lstdc++ to LIBADD option stripped in libtool archive
Mar
31
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
23
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
15
comment Rescale the secondary y axis got from twiny
Thank you for reply, M4rtini. Yes this should work (and I mentioned this in my post). However, I does want to force the aspect ratio to be "equal".
Feb
15
asked Rescale the secondary y axis got from twiny
Oct
28
accepted matplotlib: change the current axis instance (i.e., gca())
Oct
28
comment matplotlib: change the current axis instance (i.e., gca())
@Bogdan, yes, I understand that works. Still that is a break of workflow if you want to continue to use simple plt.text(). By the quick work-around I just posted in my own comment, the call plt.colorbar(im, cax=cax, ax=ax) actually reverts gca() to ax. This appears to be more convenient if I want to wrap a function to draw a colorbar with matching height.
Oct
28
comment matplotlib: change the current axis instance (i.e., gca())
I just found a quick work-around: simply specify the 'ax' argument in plt.text to be the original ax:plt.colorbar(im, cax=cax, ax=ax)
Oct
28
asked matplotlib: change the current axis instance (i.e., gca())
Aug
11
accepted How to automatically set ylim from data shown on the screen after setting xlim
Aug
11
awarded  Supporter
Aug
11
comment How to automatically set ylim from data shown on the screen after setting xlim
To me, your answer is the least confusing way. But there could be a quick improvement, that we may find y_low and y_high by taking the min and max between y[find_nearest(x, x_lims[0])] and y[find_nearest(x, x_lims[1])], that is: y_low = y[find_nearest(x, x_lims[0]):find_nearest(x, x_lims[1])].min() y_high = y[find_nearest(x, x_lims[0]):find_nearest(x, x_lims[1])].max().
Aug
11
comment How to automatically set ylim from data shown on the screen after setting xlim
Thanks Saullo, however, autoscale(axis='y') still calculates the data range from the full data set, including data points not shown on the screen
Aug
11
asked How to automatically set ylim from data shown on the screen after setting xlim
Apr
4
awarded  Scholar
Apr
4
accepted Python: is the “old” memory free'd when a variable is assigned new content?
Apr
4
comment Python: is the “old” memory free'd when a variable is assigned new content?
Thank you Mark. I will try it out. It looks formidable for me, though. Actually I was wandering is there a "general" principle, like, "wrapping thing in functions". Thank you for the suggestion.
Apr
4
comment Python: is the “old” memory free'd when a variable is assigned new content?
Thank you Sven. The problem for me is that sometimes I need to operate big matrices. In consideration of memory and speed, I always wrap things in functions, hoping that at least any extra memory allocated in a function will be free'd at end of THE function. Is that a good way to avoid bad things? BTW, I do use NumPy arrays mainly, is there a good alternative regarding both performance and convenience?
Apr
4
awarded  Student