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 Yearling
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Apr
26
comment How to construct a std::string from a std::vector<char>?
That would be true if v were a string, but the target type is a string and v is a vector. (But it is nice to see that C++17 will give strings parity with vector.)
Apr
25
comment How to construct a std::string from a std::vector<char>?
@Jamie: By the way, in C++98, string(&v[0], v.size()) should work also, but only after assert(not v.empty());, since if the vector is empty, both v[0] and v.front() would invoke undefined behavior. That, aside from the syntactic simplicity of not having to use the address-of operator, is the real benefit of C++11's data() function, which works even on an empty vector.
Apr
25
comment How to construct a std::string from a std::vector<char>?
Why can't you use data() to modify the buffer? It looks to me like if you call data() on a non-const vector, it will return a T * (and if your vector is const, 'v[0]` would return a T const & anyway).
Apr
20
comment Constexpr Variable Appears Uninitialized Inside Lambda
Note: Leading underscores are reserved in global scope, so technically this code has undefined behavior.
Apr
20
comment is it possible to initialize static variable with lambda?
@theV0ID, the return type isn't necessary on a lambda if it can be deduced from the return statement (as it can here). (Side note: If the parameter list is empty, as it is here, it is also optional. Thus, this could be written using: static auto myMap = []{ return std::map<int,int>(); }();)
Apr
6
comment What is the difference between static_cast and Implicit_cast?
You have "derived" and "base" backwards here. A derived pointer can always be converted to a (public or accessible) base, but the down-conversion requires an explicit cast.
Feb
22
comment What are Aggregates and PODs and how/why are they special?
@AndyT, Yeah, you're essentially correct, IME, about the aliasing rule. Two distinct instances of the same type are required to have distinct memory addresses. (This allows object identity tracking with memory addresses.) The base object and the first derived member are different instances, so they must have different addresses, which forces padding to be added, affecting the class's layout. If they were of different types, it wouldn't matter; objects with different types are allowed to have the same address (a class and its first data member, for example).
Nov
25
comment Using “super” in C++
You also don't have access to base class constructors in your initializer lists. (This can be compensated for in C++11 using inheriting constructors in MakeAlias or perfect forwarding, but it does require you to refer to the MakeAlias<BaseAlias> constructors rather than just referring to C's constructors directly.)
Oct
14
revised How do I forward a rvalue reference?
Add examples and some explanation.
Sep
4
comment How to declare a friend that is a member function of another not yet defined class in C++?
Yeah. This answer should be modified to make it clear that the suggestion doesn't do exactly what the question was asking --- because what the question wants isn't possible. If someone were to apply this answer, they may not think carefully about the fact that they're granting much broader access than the original question asked for. (To take the idea to the extreme: Another solution would be to make the private members of A public. This would also grant the desired access, but again, it would be granting much more access than the OP was looking for, which should be pointed out.)
Jun
14
awarded  Yearling
May
13
comment What is the difference between read and pread in unix?
Not quite. It shows that pread() either doesn't change the file position or doesn't care about the file position. (As it happens, both are true.)
Mar
28
comment One instance of class per thread, C++11
How do you avoid throwing destructors? From C++11 onward, an uncaught exception escaping from a destructor will normally crash the program via terminate() since destructors are noexcept by default (and that default should generally not be overridden, to avoid the colliding exception problem). Generally, writing to a log involves resource manipulation that can not be guaranteed to succeed.
Jan
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
22
comment Avoiding unused variables warnings when using assert() in a Release build
You should just use the NDEBUG macro for this. Its standard-specified behavior is to be set exactly when assert() is disabled.
Sep
22
comment Avoiding unused variables warnings when using assert() in a Release build
IME, command-query separation doesn't help you as much if you store the result of a query to verify it later. (E.g., that a list has shortened in length or that a computed value is the same before and after a supposedly invariant transformation.) Rerunning the query inside the assert() doesn't help because you need to assert against the value of the query from some previous point in time.
Aug
14
comment Match iterable types (arrays and classes with begin()/end())
Ah, I didn't realize that the return type is used in the deduction and that implicit return types don't participate. So doing that would result in a hard failure at compile time rather than has_iterator correctly specialized? I'll have to read up on that. (I assumed that C++1y was the context, since this question is tagged C++1y and isn't tagged C++11.)
Aug
14
comment Match iterable types (arrays and classes with begin()/end())
Since we're in C++1y here, could we not use deduced return types to simplify-out the decltype usages? Something like: template<typename R> auto adl_begin( R &&r ) { using std::begin; return begin(std::forward<R>(r)); } That avoids the need for the adl_details namespace completely, no?
Jul
23
comment C++: Immutable method versions
It's true (and mostly awesome) that C++11 injects moves into a lot of helpful places, but (under the assumption that someValueOfType_dataType and someOtherValueOfType_dataType are lvalues, which is what I would assume since they're written out like variables), I don't see any points in this code where that applies. If the two values are intended to be rvalues, I would hint that by writing move(foo) around them. (Or at least put empty parentheses after them so that they might be functions returning rvalues.)