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Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
10
awarded  Popular Question
May
1
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
7
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
27
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
19
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
7
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
4
accepted MPEG-DASH and fragmented mp4
Oct
22
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
12
comment MPEG-DASH and fragmented mp4
Is the manifest you're talking about just the manifest (.mpd file) sent to the client? Everywhere that I read about DASH the only manifest they talk about is the one sent to the client, so I wasn't aware that there was a separate one that the server uses. Can you point me to a reference?
Aug
12
comment How can HTML5 video's byte-range requests (pseudo-streaming) work?
This answer is most convincing to me, but I'm not entirely convinced that this is indeed the way the browsers are doing it. I totally agree that it can be done this way though. To clarify, I found this blog helpful: thompsonng.blogspot.com/2010/11/mp4-file-format.html If what you're saying is correct, then seeking, even in a super large video with variable bitrate, should be totally accurate? Also, do you have any references that prove that browsers are using the moov atom (stts, stsc, stco data) for seeking?
Aug
12
accepted How can HTML5 video's byte-range requests (pseudo-streaming) work?
Aug
12
comment How can HTML5 video's byte-range requests (pseudo-streaming) work?
@szatmary I think Thomas is suggesting that what is actually happening is that packets are indeed downloaded by the client until the indicator of the start of a frame is found. I suppose this is theoretically one way that the seeking could work?
Aug
12
comment How can HTML5 video's byte-range requests (pseudo-streaming) work?
@ThomasW It's not clear to me from your references how these frames are "marked", so that you may know for sure that you've hit the border of a frame. Also, your references are from old standards, like MPEG-1.
Aug
12
comment How can HTML5 video's byte-range requests (pseudo-streaming) work?
What about h.264? Also, it's not clear to me how this fits in with frames. What if the request fetched a packet from the middle of a frame? How does it know where the frame boundaries are so that it can properly continue playback?
Aug
12
asked MPEG-DASH and fragmented mp4
Aug
12
asked How can HTML5 video's byte-range requests (pseudo-streaming) work?
Jul
18
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
22
accepted Ruby do-block, and RestClient
Apr
22
comment Ruby do-block, and RestClient
What would it have to say if it were to take a block?