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Software developer, many many languages, including Scheme, Clojure, Common Lisp, Haskell, Javascript, Ruby, C# and Java. Doing software consulting. http://charlieflowers.wordpress.com


Jun
13
comment OS X Eclipse C++ Launch Failed - Binary Not Found
This answer is FANTASTIC! Thank you. I never thought it would be so hard to find the basic "getting started" steps for Eclipse and C++ on the mac.
Jun
4
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
3
awarded  Popular Question
May
28
comment Is there a better way to express a parameterless lambda than () =>?
Let me retract the "acting like a compiler instead of a human" statement. I thought, at first, that you were intentionally being overly literal. I see where you're coming from more now. Indeed, one could argue that I must resort to being overly literal at this point :)
May
28
comment Is there a better way to express a parameterless lambda than () =>?
... a loophole that should be mentioned for the sake of completeness. But in one sense, ironically, I can defend it from an "overly literal" point of view. The OP asked if there was an alternative, and the answer is, "yes, but only when an unusual set of circumstances align, and even then it's unorthodox, but here it is."
May
28
comment Is there a better way to express a parameterless lambda than () =>?
I see where you're coming from. I would say there is a small overlap between the question and the answer. And that is the first case I referred to. If you are building your own framework or DSL, and you hate the ()=> syntax so much that you're willing to really stretch to get around it, you could use _=> for all your parameterless lambdas, but remember to write the code that calls the lambda such that it passes a dummy parameter. True, it doesn't answer the literal question, I acknowledge that. And it's not often that all those "planets align." So it's not terribly practical. It's more like...
May
27
comment Is there a better way to express a parameterless lambda than () =>?
Stackoverflow popped up a message that I should avoid extended discussions and offered me a link to "automatically move this discussion to chat." I clicked the link, but I'm OK with the conversation being here or there.
May
27
comment Is there a better way to express a parameterless lambda than () =>?
Oh, by the way, since I'm praising its creativeness, I should add that I didn't invent this. I wish I could remember where I heard about it, but I don't (it was 4 years ago after all:) )
May
27
comment Is there a better way to express a parameterless lambda than () =>?
... unit test DSL or something, I wouldn't stress too much over it. Now, for the second case, where you know the lambda will be called with one parameter, the underscore "idiom" is not bad at all. It all comes down to this -- often the first response to the ()=> syntax is "yuck" (as you alluded to in your response). And as all the other answers show, there really is not much of an alternative. But there is this one tiny alternative that might help sometimes. And this tiny alternative is creative, out-of-the-box, which leads to an appreciation for it in spite of its limitations.
May
27
comment Is there a better way to express a parameterless lambda than () =>?
I can think of 2 cases where you could use this. Case one, where you're in control of the code that calls the lambda, and case two, where you know the lambda will be called with one parameter, but you don't care about it. In the first case, you'd call the lambda with a dummy parameter simply to make the _=> "idiom" possible. And I'll grant you, that would be somewhat "unorthodox". But some people will be unorthodox to get what they feel leads to "pretty" code. I'm not surprised that you would vote against it, and I'd probably lean against it too, but if someone wanted to use it in a
May
27
comment Is there a better way to express a parameterless lambda than () =>?
@Jon Skeet, you're acting like a compiler instead of a human. What the OP meant (as indicated by his response), was, "I need to use lambdas a lot in cases where I don't care about parameters, but I hate the syntax." Otherwise, he would not have been so enthusiastic about this option. (Also, please note that my first words were "Sort of", and I later added, "It's not fully what you want.") So this answer provides an alternative that doesn't work for every case you need a parameterless lambda, but it does work for those cases where you truly don't care about the parameters.
May
23
comment Please explain in the simplest, most jargon-free English possible, the “universal property of fold”?
@Bean, glad to hear it! I will be looking forward to reading it. Because though I am starting to have an inkling, I'm still a long way from being able to claim I deeply understand what a universal property is.
May
22
awarded  Nice Question
May
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
25
awarded  Famous Question
Apr
25
awarded  Great Question
Apr
18
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
18
comment books to master “proof by induction”?
Ughhhhhhhhhhhhhh.
Apr
17
comment Good practice to create extension methods that apply to System.Object?
@Patrick Karcher - I think your answer is pretty good (I voted it up), but missing one key element. You state strong feelings that it is wrong, but you do not spell out why it is wrong. Cluttering intellisense is true but not strong enough to match the strength of your feelings. "Used or depended on incorrectly" is vague, and you don't establish how having the method on Object would cause such a mistake. So ... is this just dogma on your part, or do you really have strong reasons for the way you feel?
Apr
17
comment Please explain in the simplest, most jargon-free English possible, the “universal property of fold”?
4 years since I asked, and just tonight I came across an article talking about this. I don't know if it will fully answer my question, but it is definitely related. Search this url for "universal property": jeremykun.com/2013/04/16/categories-whats-the-point