11,841 reputation
103566
bio website madeup.net
location Birch Tree, MO
age 29
visits member for 6 years
seen 18 hours ago
Java/J2EE developer

Sep
15
awarded  Yearling
Aug
21
asked Site loads from development servers in browsers except I.E. 8 with “show friendly error messages” enabled
Jul
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
2
awarded  Inquisitive
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
21
comment Spring Jdbc embedded database lifecycyle
The question is unclear. The way I'm reading it is that you're not seeing updates in your database that were made in one test method show up in another (even though you can't even be certain, in an automated fashion, that data updates were even made as you're not asserting anything). I'm not certain why you'd expect to see values saved in one test show up in another since you're extending a transactional test which should wrap each test method in a transaction so that any updates are rolled back prior to the next test's execution.
Jun
21
comment Spring Jdbc embedded database lifecycyle
That's not really a test, unless your test is simply a test of whether or not Address instances can be created, have setters applied to them, and the create and update and findAll() methods don't explode. You've asserted nothing about the behavior of your methods.
Jun
21
revised Joda-Time DateFormatter to display milliseconds if nonzero
Added missing right parenthesis
Jun
21
comment Avoiding “!= null” statements in Java?
@Ziggy It's not that I disagree with the null object pattern, and I use it all the time. It's that in this particular case, the method signature is findAction A DO_NOTHING action, by definition, is NOT FOUND! That's lying to your user. And having the user have to check for DO_NOTHING violates polymorphism - now not all your instances can be used interchangeably. To put it in perspective, let's say the method was BigDecimal findBigDecimal(String whatever) - The Null Object pattern does not work here. Finding something lies to you if zero is returned.
Jun
21
comment What is the best way to implement constants in Java?
If you need a global constant that spans all modules, there is probably something wrong with your design strategy. If you really need a global constant, make a public final class for it at the top level package and stick it there. Then delete it as soon as you realize not all of your classes actually need that constant, and move it to the package that references it the most. You can share a constant across packages, but it is a code smell to require a global constant that is not an enumerated type, as enumerated types can have behavior, but a string is a string, an int is an int, etc.
Jun
12
awarded  Good Question
Apr
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
21
comment How can I recover my page from not being able to load a javascript file?
Added that detail to the question for you. Not sure that it matters, though, the external server isn't under our control and the content is purely a javascript snippet, so I believe it has to be done in Javascript.
Apr
21
revised How can I recover my page from not being able to load a javascript file?
added 87 characters in body
Apr
21
asked How can I recover my page from not being able to load a javascript file?
Mar
20
awarded  Self-Learner
Mar
9
comment Check if a file contains strings and create an array for new strings
Files is only available on Java 7+, however. No telling if the OP has access to it.
Mar
6
comment How do I address unchecked cast warnings?
Some comments...the method signature is wrong because it doesn't "cast" a damn thing, it just copies the existing map into a new map. Also, it could probably be refactored to accept any map, and not rely on HashMap itself (i.e. take Map and return Map in the method signature, even if the internal type is HashMap). You don't really need to do the casting or the storage into a new map - if you don't throw an assertion error, then the given map has the right types inside it as of right now. Creating a new map with the generic types is pointless as you could still make it raw and put whatever.
Mar
3
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
27
comment Avoiding “!= null” statements in Java?
@user1050755 What you are doing with strings is both dangerous and naive. When you do checking against a literal, you want to know if that literal matches, not if the string is null. The naive way to do that is as you've suggested, with a useless null check: if(stringVar != null && stringVar.equals("literal")) But, this forces you to directly send in null input for testing coverage, resulting in unneeded branches. "".equals(stringVar) will always work regardless. If you know the literal to check on, you should always do this - it's the safest, easy to read and doesn't do extra conditions.