3,010 reputation
919
bio website ouroborosophis.blogspot.com
location Brazil
age 44
visits member for 5 years, 7 months
seen Oct 21 at 10:53
Developer since 1988

Sep
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
14
comment Why is XOR the default way to combine hashes?
@Buge I really should not post here while intoxicated...
Sep
12
comment Why is XOR the default way to combine hashes?
@Buge it's a C/C++ convention... % is the bitwise xor operator.
Jul
20
comment Set *both* elements and initial capacity of std::vector
@HowardHinnant and my point was: if it over-allocated, it's ok. You probably can afford a little "slack" RAM wasted, the alternative is almost always more expensive: another allocation and O(N) moves (or worse, copies)....
Jul
20
comment Set *both* elements and initial capacity of std::vector
Yes, v.reserve(x) will not resize the vector if x < v.capacity(). And that is a good thing, because there is no functional in-place reallocation in the C++ standard; std::vector changing sizes implies v.size() copies...
Jul
20
comment Set *both* elements and initial capacity of std::vector
PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE DO NOT USE shrink_to_fit. Ever.
Jul
8
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
17
comment Template default argument SFINAE ambiguous to clang, fine for g++
I would go further and risk that the problem is in the implementation of std::array by libc++...
Jun
17
comment Template default argument SFINAE ambiguous to clang, fine for g++
Yeah, but the bug seems to be in libc++; compiling with clang++-3.5 and gcc-4.8's libstdc++ gives me no errors.
Jun
16
comment Why this inconsistency in padding data members?
@nwp there's our reason: compatibility with idiotic mircosoft compilers... delorie.com/gnu/docs/gcc/gcc_10.html
Jun
16
comment Why this inconsistency in padding data members?
@MaximYegorushkin nice pointers! stackoverflow.com/questions/2457182/…
Jun
16
comment Why this inconsistency in padding data members?
@nwp then I (yes, I concur, strangely) get 4 in 32-bits and 8 in 64-bits. If I had to guess, I would say that proably in x86 32-bits machines, the protocol to get to parts of an struct (indirect loads via edx+offset or something?) needs/wants less alignment than to get to "free" variables (usually stored in registers and loaded directly from the memory to a register)
Jun
16
comment Why this inconsistency in padding data members?
Actually, g++ and clang++ give me 8 bytes as alignof(double), both with 64 and 32 bits targets.
Jun
15
comment Why variadic function can't “eat” the list-initialization argument in C++11?
map.emplace(1, std::pair<int,int>{1,1}) works, doesn't it?
Jun
10
comment How to inherit a member function so that it always returns a reference to the derived instance?
(each of the CRTP base templates is a mixin -- also here)
Jun
10
comment How to inherit a member function so that it always returns a reference to the derived instance?
@Stefan: you only need to specify using A<C>::f if you go multi-level; you can always use things like template<class Cl> struct increment_pointer_t { Cl& operator++() { ++internal_pointer; return static_cast<Cl&>(*this); } }; template<class Cl> struct do_other_thing_t { Cl& other_thing() { return static_cast<Cl&> *this; } }; class one_and_other : public some_other_base, public increment_pointer_t<one_and_other>, public do_other_thing_t<one_and_other> {}; and one_and_other does not need using: there is no ambiguity as long as other_base does not define operator++ or other_thing.
Jun
10
comment How to inherit a member function so that it always returns a reference to the derived instance?
@Stefan I don't really see the ugliness. Yes, you have for each level of inheritance, to do like struct B: A<B> {}; struct C: B, A<C> { using A<C>::operator*; } };... but this begs the question: does your iterator hierarchy need to be multilevel-deep? (or maybe you have another mixin, besides A<Class> that you can multi-inherit in your iterators?)
Jun
10
comment C++ Iterator generalize - different containers, same type
@FrancisM.Bacon you are probably reading the wrong documentation. Try here and follow the link for the concept RandomAccessIterator...
Jun
9
comment Why can't a specialized template function accept both a type and it's constant version?
@user3613229 I'm gonna comment: I love C++11 because you type less and DRY more. Repeating is introducing errors. :D
Jun
9
comment Why can't a specialized template function accept both a type and it's constant version?
@user3613229 only if you want to pass half your programming time inserting typecasts... :(