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Jul
21
comment Environment.TickCount is not enough
This is not even close to an applicable answer to the OP's question.
Apr
10
comment azcopy - remote server returned 403 forbidden
You probably saved me an hour with this. Thank you. God damn Parallels and its resume bug.
Oct
1
comment How can I check that PowerPoint or point viewer is installed on the machine?
While I don't have a "clean" system to verify that, I'll just say that it seems highly unlikely. It's always been the case there there's a version-specific ProgID (ie PowerPoint.Application.15) and a non-version-specific ProgID (PowerPoint.Application) which both point to the same CLSID.
Sep
6
comment Best way in .NET to manage queue of tasks on a separate (single) thread
Very nice! I will definitely check this out. I have never looked into TPL Dataflow closely but it sounds like it has a lot of advantages over a dedicated thread.
Sep
5
comment Best way in .NET to manage queue of tasks on a separate (single) thread
Oh this is definitely simple, no doubt. I wasn't necessarily looking for easy, but rather a recommended approach (preferably native) that specifically addressed this concern of limiting concurrency.
Sep
5
comment Best way in .NET to manage queue of tasks on a separate (single) thread
For what it's worth, I should just reiterate that my original intention was to avoid parallelism. The API I am calling doesn't want to be called frequently. I want to stick things in a queue so the consumer can get to them one at a time.
Sep
5
comment Best way in .NET to manage queue of tasks on a separate (single) thread
Essentially what I was wondering is if .NET had added anything that allowed me to construct a private instance of something like ThreadPool but with just a single thread in the pool (or 2, or 3, etc.) and have them execute a synchronous delegate as the work item. BlockingQueue definitely makes it easier to roll my own thread to do that, but I guess there still isn't something built-in.
Sep
5
comment Best way in .NET to manage queue of tasks on a separate (single) thread
It's true that I can spin up multiple threads that monitor the same queue, but that's a code change rather than something that can be easily tweaked with a config setting or constant. But the caller doesn't care about the result or success in this case. It's simply fire-and-forget but limited to one at a time for rate-limiting purposes.
Sep
5
comment Best way in .NET to manage queue of tasks on a separate (single) thread
@Servy That is correct, it is a synchronous consumer, and that works fine when I want to restrict it to one concurrent task (and probably performs better too since it's all on the same thread). But it's also true that your semaphore solution allows an easy scale to 2 or more concurrent tasks which I might need to go to later.
Sep
5
comment Best way in .NET to manage queue of tasks on a separate (single) thread
This question - which I didn't find until it was shown as a related question - asks almost exactly the same question with pretty much the same answers. It was asked two years ago so maybe the state of .NET async hasn't changed as much as I thought? stackoverflow.com/questions/11138927/…
Sep
5
comment Best way in .NET to manage queue of tasks on a separate (single) thread
That's true, but in this scenario, that's okay because as long as any other threads are doing anything, there will be work being thrown onto the queue (even if that work may be immediately abandoned because it isn't necessary).
Sep
5
comment Best way in .NET to manage queue of tasks on a separate (single) thread
Agreed that it is a simple producer/consumer. And the concurrent collections in .NET probably would make the "spin up a new Thread(...)" scenario simpler. I guess I was assuming/hoping .NET (or a popular library) might have by now added some concept of a configurable thread pool.
Aug
20
comment Powershell mask password
Then when the user presses backspace or adds a line in the middle of the string? It gets unmanageable quickly. Pragmatic approach is to change the UI.
Aug
20
comment check processor architecture and proceed with if statement
Note that this tells if the process is 64 bit, not necessarily the operating system. If you run the x86 PowerShell on a x64 machine, that will give different results. Depending on what the OP wants to do, that may be fine or even desired. But it's worth noting nonetheless.
Apr
12
comment What's the point of delay signing of an .NET assembly?
Because unsigned assemblies can't be placed in the GAC and have very different loading behavior.
Mar
18
comment Entity Framework Code First: FOREIGN KEY constraint may cause cycles or multiple cascade paths
Thank God, I had read another answer to a similar question and figured that I would need to do all of my attribute-based mapping as fluent. IMHO, EF tries to do too much by default.
Jan
17
comment How can I know if a .net event is already handled?
The event member will only be null if there are no handlers attached at all. But there isn't a good way to tell if a specific handler is already hooked up.
Dec
26
comment Prevent Caching in ASP.NET MVC for specific actions using an attribute
It's my understanding (and I'm no jQuery expert) that cache:false only makes jQuery tack on to the query string a changing value to "trick" the browser into thinking the request is for something else. In theory, this means the browser would still cache the results, just wouldn't use the cached results. Should be more efficient on the client to disable caching via response headers.
Sep
11
comment How much job output will PowerShell hold if I don't receive it?
Thank you for the answer. I guess what I am still not 100% clear on is what PowerShell does with suspended workflows (which are a bit different than regular jobs I think). Since they can survive reboots and be resumed, it must persist the queued job output as well. But it sounds like there is no real upper limit other than memory/process limitations. Thank you for your input.
Aug
23
comment Powershell Comment Based Help for Functions
Even better, in PowerShell 3, you don't even need to mark up the parameter help. Just put a regular comment above the parameter and PowerShell figures it out.