Reputation
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333/400 score
99/80 answers
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Newest
 Yearling
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~268k people reached

23h
revised How do the OCaml operators < and > work with non-integer types?
Show `<` (not `=`) in the example, to stay on topic.
1d
answered OCaml function syntax error
1d
comment How do the OCaml operators < and > work with non-integer types?
These are true, but aren't documented. So in theory they could change with the next release of OCaml.
1d
revised How do the OCaml operators < and > work with non-integer types?
added 22 characters in body
1d
revised How do the OCaml operators < and > work with non-integer types?
added 476 characters in body
1d
revised How do the OCaml operators < and > work with non-integer types?
added 3 characters in body
1d
revised How do the OCaml operators < and > work with non-integer types?
added 74 characters in body
1d
revised How do the OCaml operators < and > work with non-integer types?
added 242 characters in body
1d
revised How do the OCaml operators < and > work with non-integer types?
added 117 characters in body
1d
answered How do the OCaml operators < and > work with non-integer types?
2d
comment Stack traces from production OCaml code?
You should do some measurement. Tossing around opinions isn't particularly useful.
2d
answered Stack traces from production OCaml code?
2d
comment Stack traces from production OCaml code?
Do you expect to have more than 1 uncaught exception every few minutes? If no, then I don't think performance is your main concern.
Jun
29
awarded  Yearling
Jun
28
answered Why can't closed subsets of polymorphic variants type check against the superset?
Jun
28
comment Referring to module types defined in toplevel files
(If you want help you'll have to show your code I think.)
Jun
28
revised Referring to module types defined in toplevel files
added 216 characters in body
Jun
28
answered Referring to module types defined in toplevel files
Jun
25
answered OCaml: Bidirectional reference
Jun
25
comment Pattern match on records with option type entries in OCaml
Yes, this is a useful abbreviation a lot of the time and good to know about. Instead of writing { a = a; b = b } you can just write { a; b }.