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Apr
15
answered Simple C program produces Blank Ouput - No Errors
Apr
15
comment move a class object through vectors
please re-read my earlier comments - the ship never gets moved into a row - only into a berth.
Apr
15
comment move a class object through vectors
you find the port you want, then within that port, you find the dock you want, then within that dock, you find the berth you want, and in that berth, you place the ship. The "finding" aspect will have to be whatever suits your needs, so we can't really help with that.
Apr
15
comment move a class object through vectors
you don't move the ship through the vectors - instead you navigate the hierarchy of objects to find the appropriate berth object, and then add the ship in there.
Apr
15
answered Not sure what to change return address to in buffer overflow attack
Apr
8
answered Why do compilers fix the digits of floating point number to 6?
Apr
8
comment Valgrind complaining about call to fgets
@nneonneo : the valgrind error can then still be avoided by making the buffer 32 bytes longer than what you'll actually use. ie. create a buffer of size 182, and pass 150 to fgets. Unless you're in a low-memory environment, that should not cause an issue.
Apr
8
comment Valgrind complaining about call to fgets
@nneonneo : bitten by byte-bit confusion lol. Good point as well about the malloc alignment.
Apr
8
comment virtual method vs non virtual method in the same class
@Laura : it doesn't use the virtual one because it's virtual, but because it's const.
Apr
8
comment Valgrind complaining about call to fgets
alternatively, you can make your buffer size a multiple of 4. That would stop valgrind from complaining about this specific issue.
Apr
7
comment Valgrind reporting too many mallocs
@user3711622 : you can't in general with valgrind's leak checker. But that's not what that's for anyway. What you want, is a memory profiler, like massif eg. (or any other that strikes your fancy). Since that's no longer related to your original question though, any further questions about that would belong in a new question.
Apr
7
comment Valgrind reporting too many mallocs
@user3711622 : As I said, the leaks among those blocks are already suppressed. If you mean you don't want to display them as part of the total heap usage, then afaik that's not possible. There shouldn't be a reason to either.
Apr
7
comment Valgrind reporting too many mallocs
@user3711622 : you don't need to create one. The default suppression file already suppresses those system leaks (as evidenced by the original valgrind output you showed).
Apr
7
comment Valgrind reporting too many mallocs
@user3711622 : try removing the free(string); line from your code - the valgrind output should then report a leak (clearly distinguishable from the suppressed leaks).
Apr
7
comment Valgrind reporting too many mallocs
@user3711622 : that's what the suppression file is for - it suppresses these known leaks, so you can focus on the real ones (by looking at the other lines in the leak summary eg.).
Apr
7
comment Valgrind reporting too many mallocs
@user3711622 : yes - they are usually false positives, and only sometimes real leaks in system libraries that are difficult to fix. But I've never seen them amount to much. In other words : if they are suppressed by default, they should be safe to ignore.
Apr
7
answered Valgrind reporting too many mallocs
Apr
7
comment Valgrind reporting too many mallocs
As indicated further in the output, those "leaked" blocks are suppressed - if you're using the default suppression file, those would be allocations done by system libraries and the like. You can use the -v option to get more details on what was suppressed.
Apr
2
comment Compile-time bitwise operations in C/C++
you probably want to read §6.6 ("Constant expressions") in ISO/IEC 9899:1999, which addresses this. Or alternatively this overview.
Mar
19
comment C language calculation in printf
@SleepyBear Your understanding is mostly correct - the output is undefined behavior because the parameter type (double) doesn't match the expected type (int). Undefined behavior means anything is possible, including having 0 as output.