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15138329
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location Redmond, WA
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visits member for 5 years, 5 months
seen 10 hours ago

I'm a Microsoft Software Development Engineer on the Trustworthy Computing Team. I've worked at several security related places previously, including Malware Bytes and PreEmptive Solutions.

On StackOverflow I mostly answer related questions, though I occasionally forray into and a couple of others.

I am the author of pevFind, a component of the ComboFix malware removal tool, and volunteer at BleepingComputer.com as a malware response instructor. My Twitter account is @MalwareMinigun.


10h
comment Is Visual Studio buggy in printing the function address?
@Lightness: Sure, /Za may work here. But /Za doesn't work under a lot of scenarios (e.g. you can't include windows.h with it turned on, for example). That's why I asked about /W4 which just turns on more warnings.
10h
comment Is Visual Studio buggy in printing the function address?
@Lightness: I'm saying don't even bother using Visual Studio -- just drop to a VS command prompt and do cl /W4 /EHsc your_test_file.cpp && your_test_file.exe
10h
comment Is Visual Studio buggy in printing the function address?
Have you compiled under /W4? You should get a "function pointer cast to data pointer" or similar warning. Or maybe I have that backwards.
2d
awarded  Popular Question
2d
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
25
revised How memory is allocated for private and public members of the class
Added link to standard
Aug
25
comment How memory is allocated for private and public members of the class
@user: Yes, it can vary in the above example. It would be entirely conforming to pack all the bitfields into a 64 bit integer member of the class, for example, and different compilers will likely choose different answers. See standardese references in my answer.
Aug
25
revised How memory is allocated for private and public members of the class
added 24 characters in body
Aug
25
comment How memory is allocated for private and public members of the class
Ah, I forgot. In order to be standard layout (one of the requirements for POD) all of the access control must be the same. So, for example, if all non-static data members were private, that would be fine. But mixing public and private members is not.
Aug
25
revised How memory is allocated for private and public members of the class
added 239 characters in body
Aug
25
comment How memory is allocated for private and public members of the class
POD doesn't really have anything to do with accessibility. POD doesn't say anything about the layout of a class. POD classes have the feature that they are memcpy-able (std::is_trivially_copyable) and that they are considered constructed as soon as storage is allocated (no constructor call).
Aug
25
revised How memory is allocated for private and public members of the class
added 239 characters in body
Aug
25
comment How memory is allocated for private and public members of the class
Note that the compiler is completely allowed to reorder things between accessibility blocks. For example, if the compiler wants to put all private members first for some reason it would be allowed to do so.
Aug
25
answered How memory is allocated for private and public members of the class
Aug
25
comment Windows Sublime Text 3 “make: *** No targets specified and no makefile found. Stop.”
Just looks like a bug in cygwin's make :(
Aug
24
asked How can I cause Visual Studio to respect AdditionalProperties on dependencies?
Aug
20
accepted How do I inform dependent projects that an output must be copied local when they use ProjectReference?
Aug
20
revised Can I declare a string in a header file in a definition of a class?
deleted 7 characters in body
Aug
19
comment How does one describe a choice of sets / complexTypes in XML Schema?
@Wrikken: I updated the question to better describe the issue -- if you just put elements of those types under xs:choice then you break the Unique Particle Attribution Rule.
Aug
19
revised How does one describe a choice of sets / complexTypes in XML Schema?
added 1292 characters in body